Tuesday, 30 September 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Feb 08

Move Our World Beyond War

By Staff, Truthout | Video

The video is mightier than the hellfire missile. Make this one go viral. Learn more at http://worldbeyondwar.org

Washington, DC – The Government Accountability Project (GAP) is distributing and encouraging use of a Privacy Statement for all Internet users to adopt as part of their signature line in their online communications. Similar to the standard legal disclaimers found at the end of many emails, this Privacy Statement goes further by explicitly prohibiting the collection of the communication and related metadata by the National Security Agency (NSA), consistent with the disclosures of the bulk metadata collection programrevealed by GAP client Edward Snowden in June 2013.

Washington, DC – Legislators in California, Georgia, and Oklahoma are joining a national movement to reign in reckless outsourcing of public services to for-profit corporations and private entities, introducing bills that would keep taxpayers in control of their public services by increasing transparency and accountability standards for outsourcing deals.

Feb 07

Florida Does it Again

By Laura Finley, Truthout | Op-Ed

Last time I wrote about things that trouble me in my current home state of Florida, I received some pretty nasty responses. One person emailed that my criticism of some of the laws in the state was an affront to those who have served the U.S in foreign wars (I still don’t see how, but never mind) and strongly suggested that I move to Russia or Saudi Arabia. But, eight years after my arrival, I am still here, and at the risk of receiving even more hateful responses, I am again compelled to offer a criticism of some of Florida’s latest dandies.

The D.C. Council took a major step to decriminalizing marijuana in the nation’s capital today by voting 11-1 in favor of a bill that would eliminate criminal penalties for the possession of one ounce or less of marijuana and treat possession as a civil offense. The D.C. Council takes a final vote on the bill in early March; it is expected to pass and to be signed into law by the mayor. It is viewed by both council members and advocates as a model for other jurisdictions looking to reduce racial disparities in the criminal justice system.

Each February we reflect upon black history and honor prominent black leaders who have made a positive contribution to American history. However, some prominent black leaders are consistently overlooked during this month of black reflection, despite their significant roles in American history. Marcus Garvey (1867-1940) is one such leader who is too often overlooked.

Taking advantage of the Super Bowl hype, Mother Jones magazine just released an article “Offensive Lines: How Bad Is Your NFL Team’s Owner?” following up on its earlier “Is Your Team’s Owner a Major League Asshole?” While Mother Jones’s intention to decry the increasing inequality in contemporary American society is laudable, its attempted shaming of professional team owners as “evil-doers” may be a counterproductive distraction. More importantly, in blaming individuals for society’s ills, MoJo loses an opportunity to engage in good journalism.

We denounce the cyanide based mining projects from Certej, Deva-Muncel, Băiţa Crăciunești, Brad, Rovina și Roșia Montană, projects that have destructive effects towards nature and humans and can only start with no regard of legal procedures. Only at Certej, in 16 years of operation 26.448 tons of sodium cyanide and 15.280 tons of copper sulphate would be used. Large-scale cyanide use does not bring prosperity to a community, only death and the impossibility to develop other economic activities. We denounce deeds that reek of corruption, conflict of interests and abuses of Nicolae Stanca, current director at Deva Gold. He has signed, in the name of the Romanian state, the associating documents between Minvest Deva and Gabriel Resources in 1997, then being employed by the controverted businessman Frank Timis.

Feb 04

Minimum Wage: Hope for the Poor

By Dan Arel, Truthout | Op-Ed

After President Obama’s latest State of the Union address, the media lit up. The most controversial thing he said? Not gun control, we have heard that all before. Not the war. What could have been so controversial that it out shined some of the hottest topics in the media today? Minimum Wage.

Why is this so controversial? Why wouldn’t we want to give everyone who makes $7.25 an hour a pay raise to $9.00? The GOP is calling it crazy, but in reality it’s not crazy at all. In fact, it makes complete sense from both a moral and a prudential standpoint.

As pro se defendants, we are probably naive about how the U.S. “justice” system works.

We understood from our charges that any alleged trespass must occur on private property.

We further understood that any alleged annoyance, any alleged disturbance, any alleged recklessness, construed as disorderly conduct, must occur on public property.

Squaring that circle, we’ve been thinking, would surely result in at least one of those charges being dropped.

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

Feb 08

Move Our World Beyond War

By Staff, Truthout | Video

The video is mightier than the hellfire missile. Make this one go viral. Learn more at http://worldbeyondwar.org

Washington, DC – The Government Accountability Project (GAP) is distributing and encouraging use of a Privacy Statement for all Internet users to adopt as part of their signature line in their online communications. Similar to the standard legal disclaimers found at the end of many emails, this Privacy Statement goes further by explicitly prohibiting the collection of the communication and related metadata by the National Security Agency (NSA), consistent with the disclosures of the bulk metadata collection programrevealed by GAP client Edward Snowden in June 2013.

Washington, DC – Legislators in California, Georgia, and Oklahoma are joining a national movement to reign in reckless outsourcing of public services to for-profit corporations and private entities, introducing bills that would keep taxpayers in control of their public services by increasing transparency and accountability standards for outsourcing deals.

Feb 07

Florida Does it Again

By Laura Finley, Truthout | Op-Ed

Last time I wrote about things that trouble me in my current home state of Florida, I received some pretty nasty responses. One person emailed that my criticism of some of the laws in the state was an affront to those who have served the U.S in foreign wars (I still don’t see how, but never mind) and strongly suggested that I move to Russia or Saudi Arabia. But, eight years after my arrival, I am still here, and at the risk of receiving even more hateful responses, I am again compelled to offer a criticism of some of Florida’s latest dandies.

The D.C. Council took a major step to decriminalizing marijuana in the nation’s capital today by voting 11-1 in favor of a bill that would eliminate criminal penalties for the possession of one ounce or less of marijuana and treat possession as a civil offense. The D.C. Council takes a final vote on the bill in early March; it is expected to pass and to be signed into law by the mayor. It is viewed by both council members and advocates as a model for other jurisdictions looking to reduce racial disparities in the criminal justice system.

Each February we reflect upon black history and honor prominent black leaders who have made a positive contribution to American history. However, some prominent black leaders are consistently overlooked during this month of black reflection, despite their significant roles in American history. Marcus Garvey (1867-1940) is one such leader who is too often overlooked.

Taking advantage of the Super Bowl hype, Mother Jones magazine just released an article “Offensive Lines: How Bad Is Your NFL Team’s Owner?” following up on its earlier “Is Your Team’s Owner a Major League Asshole?” While Mother Jones’s intention to decry the increasing inequality in contemporary American society is laudable, its attempted shaming of professional team owners as “evil-doers” may be a counterproductive distraction. More importantly, in blaming individuals for society’s ills, MoJo loses an opportunity to engage in good journalism.

We denounce the cyanide based mining projects from Certej, Deva-Muncel, Băiţa Crăciunești, Brad, Rovina și Roșia Montană, projects that have destructive effects towards nature and humans and can only start with no regard of legal procedures. Only at Certej, in 16 years of operation 26.448 tons of sodium cyanide and 15.280 tons of copper sulphate would be used. Large-scale cyanide use does not bring prosperity to a community, only death and the impossibility to develop other economic activities. We denounce deeds that reek of corruption, conflict of interests and abuses of Nicolae Stanca, current director at Deva Gold. He has signed, in the name of the Romanian state, the associating documents between Minvest Deva and Gabriel Resources in 1997, then being employed by the controverted businessman Frank Timis.

Feb 04

Minimum Wage: Hope for the Poor

By Dan Arel, Truthout | Op-Ed

After President Obama’s latest State of the Union address, the media lit up. The most controversial thing he said? Not gun control, we have heard that all before. Not the war. What could have been so controversial that it out shined some of the hottest topics in the media today? Minimum Wage.

Why is this so controversial? Why wouldn’t we want to give everyone who makes $7.25 an hour a pay raise to $9.00? The GOP is calling it crazy, but in reality it’s not crazy at all. In fact, it makes complete sense from both a moral and a prudential standpoint.

As pro se defendants, we are probably naive about how the U.S. “justice” system works.

We understood from our charges that any alleged trespass must occur on private property.

We further understood that any alleged annoyance, any alleged disturbance, any alleged recklessness, construed as disorderly conduct, must occur on public property.

Squaring that circle, we’ve been thinking, would surely result in at least one of those charges being dropped.