Saturday, 29 November 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

As the American public school year begins, parents and guardians across the country are getting to know new teachers, bus routes, routines and worrying increasingly about violence and bullying as we send our children into the semi-unknown. It’s a busy, nervous time of year. Parents of school-aged children in Syria and Iraq have other worries. An August 2014 United Nations Human Rights Council report states that both state and non-state armed groups in the region have been recruiting children for combat and non-combat support roles in violent conflict – both war crimes and violations of international human rights. Some of these armed groups use schools as recruitment, training and living quarters. The Islamic State (ISIS) has “established training camps to recruit children into armed roles under the guise of education,” according to the August 2014 UNHRC report. For their participation, ISIS offers children education, employment and the glory of military service.

Valdemar W. Setzer graduated in Electronic Engineering in 1963 and earned a PhD in Applied Mathematics from the Polytechnic School of Universidade de São Paulo in 1967. He retired in 1995, but continues to guide students and teaching. Setzer has extensive experience as a lecturer on history and philosophical aspects of computing, electronic media, education and philosophical issues of technology. He is also a member of the Anthroposophical Society. In Setzer's younger years, he was the soloist flutist of the former Chamber Orchestra of São Paulo under the conductor Olivier Toni. Dr. Setzer is the author of numerous books and articles on education, technology, philosophy and a number of other issues.

I personally carried around, as a general guide, his essay, The Obsolescence of Education for my entire teaching career. When I reached out to him a couple of weeks ago, he informed me that it needed to be updated. I was stunned to see that the article was updated as late as August 21, 2014, after having it intact since the year 2000, when I started teaching. Dr. Setzer is a very inspiring intellectual. I asked him about the obsolescence of education.

Sep 10

Scottish Independence: Now Is the Time

By Jim McCluskey, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

We are all citizens of the world now.

Potentially, the internet interconnects everyone on the planet. International trade forms a network of interlinked states. Weapons are so powerful that local war could bring death anywhere on the globe. The fate of the planet is interlinked with the fate of each one of us.

All this renders the old concepts of nationalism meaningless: the view that we look after our own interests regardless of its effect on others.

Washington, DC - The UN General Assembly passed a historic resolution to begin treaty negotiations to enact a global bankruptcy process and stop predatory hedge funds. The resolution passed by a super-majority vote of 124-11 with 41 abstentions. The US voted no along with 10 other countries. The bankruptcy process could make it more difficult for hold-out investors to block countries from debt restructuring and could limit future defaults. 

"The strong majority vote shows how powerful the global consensus is to stop predatory financial behavior," noted Eric LeCompte, Executive Director of the religious debt relief organization, Jubilee USA. "If we are going to solve what global leaders believe is the root cause of inequality, we need a bankruptcy system in place." LeCompte serves on UN expert groups working to create an international bankruptcy process.

Sep 10

Blowback

By Lee R. Haven, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

“Oh oh.”

“What now?”

“Looks like we’re having another ‘They hate our freedoms’ moment.”

“'They hate our freedoms?’ Oh, what Bush said when….”

“Yeah - when 9-11 eleven happened. The definitive answer. And no reporter in that room followed up on it then when he said it or later.”

“They aren’t that crazy about our culture.”

The New York Times gave readers only part of the story in an article on the Democratic primary race for governor of Rhode Island. It notes that state Treasurer Gina M. Raimondo is currently the frontrunner.

On Sept. 21, 2014, the People’s Climate March will commence in New York City as world leaders gather for a United Nations emergency summit on climate change. Thousands of organizations have signed on and many demonstrations have been planned across the country on that day. Perhaps more than one million people will descend on Manhattan Sept. 21 to support environmental and human survival. Almost inevitably, someone from the media or a prior or the current administration will throw around the label “tree hugger” and no one will be shocked. In preparation for the march and in reflecting on the perceived negativity of this label, I’ve been thinking about the heroines of the Chipko (“tree-hugging”) movement in India.

In 1730, Amrita Devi watched men with axes enter her village with an order from the Maharajah — to cut down trees needed to build his new palace. The trees were the villagers’ source of life, the only green in an otherwise barren landscape. The forest shielded the people from the desert, protected their fragile water supply and provided fodder for the cows and twigs for the fire. What’s more, the trees and animals were sacred and not to be harmed, according to the rules of their Hindu sect.

Arms companies which provide key components for the drones used by the US to carry out secret strikes in violation of international law bought access to last week's NATO summit, research by legal charity Reprieve has found.
 
Among the firms which paid up to £300,000 to ‘exhibit’ at the summit in Newport, Wales were:

  • General Dynamics, manufacturer of the Hellfire missiles used in the vast majority of drone strikes.
  • Raytheon, manufacturer of the targeting system for the ‘Reaper’ drone which, along with the ‘Predator,’ is used by the CIA and other covert agencies to carry out strikes outside of warzones.
  • Lockheed Martin, which acts as a contractor to provide support services for the Reaper and Predator.
  • MBDA, a European firm which is producing ‘Brimstone,’ a variant of the Hellfire missile which it is promoting for use by Reaper and Predator drones.
Sep 09

The New Realpolitik

By Erin Niemela, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

The re-emergence of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and his latest book, "World Order," has prompted accolades and resentments from across the political spectrum. "World Order" is realism re-emerging in a time of American idealistic, "moral" foreign policy. Kissinger campaigns once again for the Westphalian model of world peace in which nation-states draw borders, balance power, demonstrate mutual respect for sovereignty and work to manage conflict, and peace, accordingly.

Kissinger's realism and humility, as Time Magazine's Walter Isaacson emphasizes in his Sept. 6 overview of the book, are probably in order for a nation constantly intruding violently in a multitude of conflicts under the guise of democracy, human rights and policing morality.

The promise of American democracy is colliding with the unpleasant reality of an emerging American plutocracy.

Fueled by - and reinforcing - staggering inequalities of wealth, income and power, the American political system is betraying Lincoln’s great pledge that our country would be one of, by and for the people.

Thanks to a series of US Supreme Court decisions, most notably Citizens United, the super-rich and giant corporations are pouring money into our elections at record levels.

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

As the American public school year begins, parents and guardians across the country are getting to know new teachers, bus routes, routines and worrying increasingly about violence and bullying as we send our children into the semi-unknown. It’s a busy, nervous time of year. Parents of school-aged children in Syria and Iraq have other worries. An August 2014 United Nations Human Rights Council report states that both state and non-state armed groups in the region have been recruiting children for combat and non-combat support roles in violent conflict – both war crimes and violations of international human rights. Some of these armed groups use schools as recruitment, training and living quarters. The Islamic State (ISIS) has “established training camps to recruit children into armed roles under the guise of education,” according to the August 2014 UNHRC report. For their participation, ISIS offers children education, employment and the glory of military service.

Valdemar W. Setzer graduated in Electronic Engineering in 1963 and earned a PhD in Applied Mathematics from the Polytechnic School of Universidade de São Paulo in 1967. He retired in 1995, but continues to guide students and teaching. Setzer has extensive experience as a lecturer on history and philosophical aspects of computing, electronic media, education and philosophical issues of technology. He is also a member of the Anthroposophical Society. In Setzer's younger years, he was the soloist flutist of the former Chamber Orchestra of São Paulo under the conductor Olivier Toni. Dr. Setzer is the author of numerous books and articles on education, technology, philosophy and a number of other issues.

I personally carried around, as a general guide, his essay, The Obsolescence of Education for my entire teaching career. When I reached out to him a couple of weeks ago, he informed me that it needed to be updated. I was stunned to see that the article was updated as late as August 21, 2014, after having it intact since the year 2000, when I started teaching. Dr. Setzer is a very inspiring intellectual. I asked him about the obsolescence of education.

Sep 10

Scottish Independence: Now Is the Time

By Jim McCluskey, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

We are all citizens of the world now.

Potentially, the internet interconnects everyone on the planet. International trade forms a network of interlinked states. Weapons are so powerful that local war could bring death anywhere on the globe. The fate of the planet is interlinked with the fate of each one of us.

All this renders the old concepts of nationalism meaningless: the view that we look after our own interests regardless of its effect on others.

Washington, DC - The UN General Assembly passed a historic resolution to begin treaty negotiations to enact a global bankruptcy process and stop predatory hedge funds. The resolution passed by a super-majority vote of 124-11 with 41 abstentions. The US voted no along with 10 other countries. The bankruptcy process could make it more difficult for hold-out investors to block countries from debt restructuring and could limit future defaults. 

"The strong majority vote shows how powerful the global consensus is to stop predatory financial behavior," noted Eric LeCompte, Executive Director of the religious debt relief organization, Jubilee USA. "If we are going to solve what global leaders believe is the root cause of inequality, we need a bankruptcy system in place." LeCompte serves on UN expert groups working to create an international bankruptcy process.

Sep 10

Blowback

By Lee R. Haven, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

“Oh oh.”

“What now?”

“Looks like we’re having another ‘They hate our freedoms’ moment.”

“'They hate our freedoms?’ Oh, what Bush said when….”

“Yeah - when 9-11 eleven happened. The definitive answer. And no reporter in that room followed up on it then when he said it or later.”

“They aren’t that crazy about our culture.”

The New York Times gave readers only part of the story in an article on the Democratic primary race for governor of Rhode Island. It notes that state Treasurer Gina M. Raimondo is currently the frontrunner.

On Sept. 21, 2014, the People’s Climate March will commence in New York City as world leaders gather for a United Nations emergency summit on climate change. Thousands of organizations have signed on and many demonstrations have been planned across the country on that day. Perhaps more than one million people will descend on Manhattan Sept. 21 to support environmental and human survival. Almost inevitably, someone from the media or a prior or the current administration will throw around the label “tree hugger” and no one will be shocked. In preparation for the march and in reflecting on the perceived negativity of this label, I’ve been thinking about the heroines of the Chipko (“tree-hugging”) movement in India.

In 1730, Amrita Devi watched men with axes enter her village with an order from the Maharajah — to cut down trees needed to build his new palace. The trees were the villagers’ source of life, the only green in an otherwise barren landscape. The forest shielded the people from the desert, protected their fragile water supply and provided fodder for the cows and twigs for the fire. What’s more, the trees and animals were sacred and not to be harmed, according to the rules of their Hindu sect.

Arms companies which provide key components for the drones used by the US to carry out secret strikes in violation of international law bought access to last week's NATO summit, research by legal charity Reprieve has found.
 
Among the firms which paid up to £300,000 to ‘exhibit’ at the summit in Newport, Wales were:

  • General Dynamics, manufacturer of the Hellfire missiles used in the vast majority of drone strikes.
  • Raytheon, manufacturer of the targeting system for the ‘Reaper’ drone which, along with the ‘Predator,’ is used by the CIA and other covert agencies to carry out strikes outside of warzones.
  • Lockheed Martin, which acts as a contractor to provide support services for the Reaper and Predator.
  • MBDA, a European firm which is producing ‘Brimstone,’ a variant of the Hellfire missile which it is promoting for use by Reaper and Predator drones.
Sep 09

The New Realpolitik

By Erin Niemela, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

The re-emergence of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and his latest book, "World Order," has prompted accolades and resentments from across the political spectrum. "World Order" is realism re-emerging in a time of American idealistic, "moral" foreign policy. Kissinger campaigns once again for the Westphalian model of world peace in which nation-states draw borders, balance power, demonstrate mutual respect for sovereignty and work to manage conflict, and peace, accordingly.

Kissinger's realism and humility, as Time Magazine's Walter Isaacson emphasizes in his Sept. 6 overview of the book, are probably in order for a nation constantly intruding violently in a multitude of conflicts under the guise of democracy, human rights and policing morality.

The promise of American democracy is colliding with the unpleasant reality of an emerging American plutocracy.

Fueled by - and reinforcing - staggering inequalities of wealth, income and power, the American political system is betraying Lincoln’s great pledge that our country would be one of, by and for the people.

Thanks to a series of US Supreme Court decisions, most notably Citizens United, the super-rich and giant corporations are pouring money into our elections at record levels.