Thursday, 02 October 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

We are the workers who are employed by private companies through federal contracts, concessions and leases. Yet, while our employers reap billions of dollars in profits from taxpayers every year, we are paid such low wages that we are unable to afford basic needs such as food, clothing, and even rent.

We are uniting to call on the federal government to stop being America's leading poverty job creator by paying us living wages and benefits. We are fighting to make America a Good Jobs Nation once again

We're told the economy is in recovery. But is it really? Recovery for who?

Some of the facts from this episode are from an Alternet article by Les Leopold.

May 09

Three Things Obama Can Do To Close Guantanamo

By Palina Prasasouk, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

May 21, 2009, Protecting Our System and Our Values speech by Obama:

"So going forward, my administration will work with Congress to develop an appropriate legal regime" to handle such detainees "so that our efforts are consistent with our values and our Constitution."

April 30th, 2013, White House news conference when asked about the hunger strike:

"I've asked my team to review everything that's currently being done in Guantanamo, everything that we can do administratively, and I'm going to re-engage with Congress to try to make the case that this is not something that's in the best interests of the American people."

May 09

Financial Institutions Admit Austerity Failed

By Ken Klippenstein, SpeakOut | News Analysis

2013 has been something of a confessional period for the economic managerial class. The IMF's chief economist perhaps demonstrated this point best when he conceded that "forecasters significantly underestimated the increase in unemployment and the decline in domestic demand associated with fiscal consolidation (a polite term for "austerity)." Other ranking figures from the IMF, US Treasury, EU, and other financial institutions have similarly reversed their position on austerity.

Meanwhile, Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff, the Harvard economists responsible for one of the more influential studies used to defend austerity have admitted, "austerity is not the only answer to a debt problem." This came after three economists at the University of Massachusetts accused them of "selective exclusion" of data. Reinhart and Rogoff have since admitted that their critics "correctly identified a spreadsheet coding error." In my view, their most striking error is being ignored: the failure to recognize that austerity didn't work during the Great Depression and won't work now, during the Great Recession. Anyone can make a spreadsheet error. It takes a Harvard professor to forget basic history.

May 09

Cinderella Redux

By Richard Waddell, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Ronald Reagan said that "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." Notice he spoke of a problem (singular), but conservatives seem to believe government is not the solution to any problem. Many hold this attitude even though we, through our federal government, prevailed in 2 world wars and a "cold war."

We have also, through our government, made some incredibly smart investments. These investments include, of course, the massive transportation grids, including especially the highways and railroads. They also include ports, airports, and other infrastructure investments.

Jason Collins has announced to the world that he is a gay.

This is a marvelous act. It is being congratulated by many including many NBA players and many other professional athletes as well as politicians, team owners, and celebrities. Good. Jason Collins exhibits admirable courage and eloquence albeit that this announcement would have been more difficult to make five or ten years ago. And even greater than that fifteen or twenty years ago. Yet, alas, how much the better thingswould now be in many ways if an athlete not yet retired could have made such an announcement twenty, fifteen, ten or five years ago. Because the social and socio-political resonances and permutations of this could have played a role, small but significant, in what would have been a historically even more beneficial impetus towards helping to reduce the sum of suffering, anguish, fear, and indecision, particularly among LGBT children and young people, and the sum of prejudice and violence against this community. If something is truly possible at an earlier historical moment, and I believe such an annoncement was, then better sooner rather than later. Better positive effects and their potential to proliferate earlier rather than later. 2013 is very late in relation to what could have happened five and ten and even fifteen years ago and this missed possibility can give us much upon which we can reflect and particularly in terms of what those who did not have contemplate the kind of announcement that Collins had now made.

 

The Obama administration has seemingly painted itself into yet another military corner by announcing that use of chemical weapons by Syria would constitute a red line that would mandate military action on the part of the United States. Now we are hearing reports that the red line may have been crossed, and some prominent officials are calling for the U.S. to step up its aid to the rebels and/or impose a no-fly zone. Proponents of military action such as Secretary of State John Kerry and hawkish Senator John McCain seem to think that the U.S. can sort out the "good guys" in the Syrian civil war, and use U.S. military assets to help the rebels take down the Assad government.

Demanding Accountability For The Past, Democracy For The Future, The People's Response gathered in Dallas, TX April 22-26, 2013 to coincide with the dedication of the Bush Presidential Center on April 25, 2013.

Former President George W. Bush said he's "really looking forward to writing the final chapter of my life" at Southern Methodist University as the school formally welcomed his presidential center to campus. "I hope it's a long chapter. But however long it is, it's going to be here," Bush said at the welcome ceremony, part of SMU's Founders' Day celebration.

Glenn Greenwald's article in The Guardian titled "Bradley Manning is off limits at SF Gay Pride parade, but corporate sleaze is embraced" has internationally publicized the cowardly decision of the San Francisco Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Pride Celebration Committee to rescind its election of political prisoner U.S. Army Private Bradley Manning as a Grand Marshal of the annual Gay Pride Parade. Manning is the gay service member charged with giving WikiLeaks thousands of classified documents exposing U.S. atrocities in Iraq, along with other materials.

The decision to rescind the invitation was made in less than 24 hours after the president of the American Military Partners Association (AMPA) made the request to reverse the invitation. The amazing election of Manning and subsequent and scandalous renunciation of that election, however, may prove to be the galvanizing point of the left of the LGBTQ community, which has become increasingly vocal in criticizing the conservative bastion that promotes a pro-corporate atmosphere of the Parade and Festival. Indeed, there is the beginning of a struggle and a political revival of the SF Pride Parade as a vehicle for raising awareness of progressive political causes because of the latest Manning decision.

May 08

In Praise of Richard Falk

By Lawrence Davidson, To the Point Analysis | News Analysis

Shortly after the 15 April 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, Richard Falk, professor emeritus of international law at Princeton University and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in the Palestinian territories, published an analysis of the episode entitled "A Commentary on the Marathon Murders."

In this analysis Falk pointed out that there are "serious deficiencies in how the U.S. sees itself in the world. We should be worried by the taboo . . . imposed on any type of self-scrutiny [of U.S. foreign policy] by either the political leadership or the mainstream media." This taboo essentially blinds us to the reality of our situation. Falk continues, "The American global domination project is bound to generate all kinds of resistance in the post-colonial world. . . . Especially if there is no disposition to rethink U.S. relations with others . . . starting with the Middle East."

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Speakout

SpeakOut is Truthout's treasure chest for bloggy, quirky, personally reflective, or especially activism-focused pieces. SpeakOut articles represent the perspectives of their authors, and not those of Truthout.

We are the workers who are employed by private companies through federal contracts, concessions and leases. Yet, while our employers reap billions of dollars in profits from taxpayers every year, we are paid such low wages that we are unable to afford basic needs such as food, clothing, and even rent.

We are uniting to call on the federal government to stop being America's leading poverty job creator by paying us living wages and benefits. We are fighting to make America a Good Jobs Nation once again

We're told the economy is in recovery. But is it really? Recovery for who?

Some of the facts from this episode are from an Alternet article by Les Leopold.

May 09

Three Things Obama Can Do To Close Guantanamo

By Palina Prasasouk, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

May 21, 2009, Protecting Our System and Our Values speech by Obama:

"So going forward, my administration will work with Congress to develop an appropriate legal regime" to handle such detainees "so that our efforts are consistent with our values and our Constitution."

April 30th, 2013, White House news conference when asked about the hunger strike:

"I've asked my team to review everything that's currently being done in Guantanamo, everything that we can do administratively, and I'm going to re-engage with Congress to try to make the case that this is not something that's in the best interests of the American people."

May 09

Financial Institutions Admit Austerity Failed

By Ken Klippenstein, SpeakOut | News Analysis

2013 has been something of a confessional period for the economic managerial class. The IMF's chief economist perhaps demonstrated this point best when he conceded that "forecasters significantly underestimated the increase in unemployment and the decline in domestic demand associated with fiscal consolidation (a polite term for "austerity)." Other ranking figures from the IMF, US Treasury, EU, and other financial institutions have similarly reversed their position on austerity.

Meanwhile, Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff, the Harvard economists responsible for one of the more influential studies used to defend austerity have admitted, "austerity is not the only answer to a debt problem." This came after three economists at the University of Massachusetts accused them of "selective exclusion" of data. Reinhart and Rogoff have since admitted that their critics "correctly identified a spreadsheet coding error." In my view, their most striking error is being ignored: the failure to recognize that austerity didn't work during the Great Depression and won't work now, during the Great Recession. Anyone can make a spreadsheet error. It takes a Harvard professor to forget basic history.

May 09

Cinderella Redux

By Richard Waddell, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

Ronald Reagan said that "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." Notice he spoke of a problem (singular), but conservatives seem to believe government is not the solution to any problem. Many hold this attitude even though we, through our federal government, prevailed in 2 world wars and a "cold war."

We have also, through our government, made some incredibly smart investments. These investments include, of course, the massive transportation grids, including especially the highways and railroads. They also include ports, airports, and other infrastructure investments.

Jason Collins has announced to the world that he is a gay.

This is a marvelous act. It is being congratulated by many including many NBA players and many other professional athletes as well as politicians, team owners, and celebrities. Good. Jason Collins exhibits admirable courage and eloquence albeit that this announcement would have been more difficult to make five or ten years ago. And even greater than that fifteen or twenty years ago. Yet, alas, how much the better thingswould now be in many ways if an athlete not yet retired could have made such an announcement twenty, fifteen, ten or five years ago. Because the social and socio-political resonances and permutations of this could have played a role, small but significant, in what would have been a historically even more beneficial impetus towards helping to reduce the sum of suffering, anguish, fear, and indecision, particularly among LGBT children and young people, and the sum of prejudice and violence against this community. If something is truly possible at an earlier historical moment, and I believe such an annoncement was, then better sooner rather than later. Better positive effects and their potential to proliferate earlier rather than later. 2013 is very late in relation to what could have happened five and ten and even fifteen years ago and this missed possibility can give us much upon which we can reflect and particularly in terms of what those who did not have contemplate the kind of announcement that Collins had now made.

 

The Obama administration has seemingly painted itself into yet another military corner by announcing that use of chemical weapons by Syria would constitute a red line that would mandate military action on the part of the United States. Now we are hearing reports that the red line may have been crossed, and some prominent officials are calling for the U.S. to step up its aid to the rebels and/or impose a no-fly zone. Proponents of military action such as Secretary of State John Kerry and hawkish Senator John McCain seem to think that the U.S. can sort out the "good guys" in the Syrian civil war, and use U.S. military assets to help the rebels take down the Assad government.

Demanding Accountability For The Past, Democracy For The Future, The People's Response gathered in Dallas, TX April 22-26, 2013 to coincide with the dedication of the Bush Presidential Center on April 25, 2013.

Former President George W. Bush said he's "really looking forward to writing the final chapter of my life" at Southern Methodist University as the school formally welcomed his presidential center to campus. "I hope it's a long chapter. But however long it is, it's going to be here," Bush said at the welcome ceremony, part of SMU's Founders' Day celebration.

Glenn Greenwald's article in The Guardian titled "Bradley Manning is off limits at SF Gay Pride parade, but corporate sleaze is embraced" has internationally publicized the cowardly decision of the San Francisco Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Pride Celebration Committee to rescind its election of political prisoner U.S. Army Private Bradley Manning as a Grand Marshal of the annual Gay Pride Parade. Manning is the gay service member charged with giving WikiLeaks thousands of classified documents exposing U.S. atrocities in Iraq, along with other materials.

The decision to rescind the invitation was made in less than 24 hours after the president of the American Military Partners Association (AMPA) made the request to reverse the invitation. The amazing election of Manning and subsequent and scandalous renunciation of that election, however, may prove to be the galvanizing point of the left of the LGBTQ community, which has become increasingly vocal in criticizing the conservative bastion that promotes a pro-corporate atmosphere of the Parade and Festival. Indeed, there is the beginning of a struggle and a political revival of the SF Pride Parade as a vehicle for raising awareness of progressive political causes because of the latest Manning decision.

May 08

In Praise of Richard Falk

By Lawrence Davidson, To the Point Analysis | News Analysis

Shortly after the 15 April 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, Richard Falk, professor emeritus of international law at Princeton University and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in the Palestinian territories, published an analysis of the episode entitled "A Commentary on the Marathon Murders."

In this analysis Falk pointed out that there are "serious deficiencies in how the U.S. sees itself in the world. We should be worried by the taboo . . . imposed on any type of self-scrutiny [of U.S. foreign policy] by either the political leadership or the mainstream media." This taboo essentially blinds us to the reality of our situation. Falk continues, "The American global domination project is bound to generate all kinds of resistance in the post-colonial world. . . . Especially if there is no disposition to rethink U.S. relations with others . . . starting with the Middle East."