Friday, 24 October 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Rich People Save, Poor People Don't

Thursday, 27 February 2014 13:22 By James Kwak, The Baseline Scenario | News Analysis

It seems obvious. Yet it's often lost, both by the scolds who lecture Americans for not saving enough and by the self-appointed personal finance gurus who claim that anyone can become rich simply by saving more (and following their dodgy investment advice). Saving is sometimes seen as some kind of moral virtue, but from another perspective it's just the ultimate consumption good: saving now buys you a sense of security, insurance against misfortune, and free time in the future, which are all things that ordinary people don't have enough of.

Real Time Economics (WSJ) links to a new survey being pushed by America Saves (which appears to be a marketing campaign run by the Consumer Federation of America, which seems not to be evil*). According to the survey, there are significant differences in savings rates and accumulated savings between lower-middle- and middle-income households. And that's treating all households in the same income bracket as being alike, leaving aside differences in family structure, cost of living, etc.

I'm all for living within your means and saving for retirement and all that. But it's a myth to say, as America Saves does on its home page, "Once you start saving, it gets easier and easier and before you know it, you're on your way to making your dreams a reality." The underlying problems are stagnant real incomes for most people, rising costs (in real terms) for education and health care, increasing financial risk due to the withdrawal of the safety net, and increased longevity (good in some ways, but bad if incomes aren't rising and you want to retire at 65). That's why households are showing up at age 64 with less in retirement savings than they had just last decade. And why, if you feel like you're not saving enough, it's probably not your fault.

But America Saves itself is supported by a bunch of financial institutions and trade associations like the Investment Company Institute, which have a vested interest in getting people to entrust more money to them.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

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Rich People Save, Poor People Don't

Thursday, 27 February 2014 13:22 By James Kwak, The Baseline Scenario | News Analysis

It seems obvious. Yet it's often lost, both by the scolds who lecture Americans for not saving enough and by the self-appointed personal finance gurus who claim that anyone can become rich simply by saving more (and following their dodgy investment advice). Saving is sometimes seen as some kind of moral virtue, but from another perspective it's just the ultimate consumption good: saving now buys you a sense of security, insurance against misfortune, and free time in the future, which are all things that ordinary people don't have enough of.

Real Time Economics (WSJ) links to a new survey being pushed by America Saves (which appears to be a marketing campaign run by the Consumer Federation of America, which seems not to be evil*). According to the survey, there are significant differences in savings rates and accumulated savings between lower-middle- and middle-income households. And that's treating all households in the same income bracket as being alike, leaving aside differences in family structure, cost of living, etc.

I'm all for living within your means and saving for retirement and all that. But it's a myth to say, as America Saves does on its home page, "Once you start saving, it gets easier and easier and before you know it, you're on your way to making your dreams a reality." The underlying problems are stagnant real incomes for most people, rising costs (in real terms) for education and health care, increasing financial risk due to the withdrawal of the safety net, and increased longevity (good in some ways, but bad if incomes aren't rising and you want to retire at 65). That's why households are showing up at age 64 with less in retirement savings than they had just last decade. And why, if you feel like you're not saving enough, it's probably not your fault.

But America Saves itself is supported by a bunch of financial institutions and trade associations like the Investment Company Institute, which have a vested interest in getting people to entrust more money to them.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus