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Statement by Edward Snowden on Being Honored as a Leading Global Thinker by Foreign Policy Magazine

Monday, 16 December 2013 11:04 By Staff, Government Accountability Project | Press Release

WASHINGTON - A statement from Edward Snowden was read by Government Accountability Project (GAP) National Security & Human Rights Director Jesselyn Radack at a reception last night at the Four Seasons Hotel in Washington, DC.

The reception was held in honor of the 100 individuals named Leading Global Thinkers in 2013, an annual list now in its fifth year of the most significant visionaries and leaders in politics, business, technology, and the arts according to the editors of Foreign Policy Magazine.

Snowden and Radack, both 2013 Leading Global Thinkers, were recognized among the 10 leading voices on the issue of surveillance along with journalist Glenn Greenwald, documentarian Laura Poitras, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, and Senator Ron Wyden (D-Or).

The full text of the statement by Snowden is as follows:

It's an honor to address you tonight. I apologize for being unable to attend in person, but I’ve been having a bit of passport trouble. Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras also regrettably could not accept their invitations. As it turns out, revealing matters of "legitimate concern" nowadays puts you on the list for more than "Global Thinker" awards.

2013 has been an important year for civil society. As we look back on the events of the past year and their implications for the state of surveillance within the United States and around the world, I suspect we will remember this year less for the changes in policies that are sure to come, than for changing our minds. In a single year, people from Indonesia to Indianapolis have come to realize that dragnet surveillance is not a mark of progress, but a problem to be solved.

We've learned that we've allowed technological capabilities to dictate policies and practices, rather than ensuring that our laws and values guide our technological capabilities. And take notice: this awareness, and these sentiments, are held most strongly among the young – those with lifetimes of votes ahead of them.

Even those who may not be persuaded that our surveillance technologies have dangerously outpaced democratic controls should agree that in democracies, surveillance of the public must be debated by the public. No official may decide the limit of our rights in secret.

Today we stand at the crossroads of policy, where parliaments and presidents on every continent are grappling with how to bring meaningful oversight to the darkest corners of our national security bureaucracies. The stakes are high. James Madison warned that our freedoms are most likely to be abridged by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power. I bet my life on the idea that together, in the light of day, we can find a better balance.

I'm grateful to Foreign Policy Magazine and the many others helping to expose those encroachments and to end that silence.

Thank you.

CONTACT:

Government Accountability Project
Douglas Kim, GAP External Relations Officer
Phone: 917.907.4394
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

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Statement by Edward Snowden on Being Honored as a Leading Global Thinker by Foreign Policy Magazine

Monday, 16 December 2013 11:04 By Staff, Government Accountability Project | Press Release

WASHINGTON - A statement from Edward Snowden was read by Government Accountability Project (GAP) National Security & Human Rights Director Jesselyn Radack at a reception last night at the Four Seasons Hotel in Washington, DC.

The reception was held in honor of the 100 individuals named Leading Global Thinkers in 2013, an annual list now in its fifth year of the most significant visionaries and leaders in politics, business, technology, and the arts according to the editors of Foreign Policy Magazine.

Snowden and Radack, both 2013 Leading Global Thinkers, were recognized among the 10 leading voices on the issue of surveillance along with journalist Glenn Greenwald, documentarian Laura Poitras, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, and Senator Ron Wyden (D-Or).

The full text of the statement by Snowden is as follows:

It's an honor to address you tonight. I apologize for being unable to attend in person, but I’ve been having a bit of passport trouble. Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras also regrettably could not accept their invitations. As it turns out, revealing matters of "legitimate concern" nowadays puts you on the list for more than "Global Thinker" awards.

2013 has been an important year for civil society. As we look back on the events of the past year and their implications for the state of surveillance within the United States and around the world, I suspect we will remember this year less for the changes in policies that are sure to come, than for changing our minds. In a single year, people from Indonesia to Indianapolis have come to realize that dragnet surveillance is not a mark of progress, but a problem to be solved.

We've learned that we've allowed technological capabilities to dictate policies and practices, rather than ensuring that our laws and values guide our technological capabilities. And take notice: this awareness, and these sentiments, are held most strongly among the young – those with lifetimes of votes ahead of them.

Even those who may not be persuaded that our surveillance technologies have dangerously outpaced democratic controls should agree that in democracies, surveillance of the public must be debated by the public. No official may decide the limit of our rights in secret.

Today we stand at the crossroads of policy, where parliaments and presidents on every continent are grappling with how to bring meaningful oversight to the darkest corners of our national security bureaucracies. The stakes are high. James Madison warned that our freedoms are most likely to be abridged by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power. I bet my life on the idea that together, in the light of day, we can find a better balance.

I'm grateful to Foreign Policy Magazine and the many others helping to expose those encroachments and to end that silence.

Thank you.

CONTACT:

Government Accountability Project
Douglas Kim, GAP External Relations Officer
Phone: 917.907.4394
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus