Thursday, 23 October 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

Whistleblowers: Information Warriors for the Modern Age

Sunday, 29 December 2013 11:58 By Ted Asregadoo, Truthout | Video Interview

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Truthout Interviews Featuring Candice Bernd on Whistleblowing Ted Asregadoo

Candice Bernd. (Screenshot: Truthout)Candice Bernd. (Screenshot: Truthout)Whistleblowers. They used to call them snitches, but as rock star whistleblowers Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden have demonstrated, whistleblowing is often a very brave thing to do. If your employer is doing something illegal or unethical, and if you have knowledge of said actions, but do nothing about it because you’re trying to hold on to your job or just don’t want to ruffle any feathers, then you are, at some level, sanctioning those illegal or unethical acts. To come forward and expose your employer’s wrongdoing is to risk your own career and possibly set yourself up for costly legal action.

In this “Truthout Interviews,” I spoke with Candice Bernd, who is an assistant editor and writer at Truthout, about the steps Congress is taking to protect whistleblowers from legal action by the federal government against those who blow the whistle on illegal or unethical actions by the government.

Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

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Whistleblowers: Information Warriors for the Modern Age

Sunday, 29 December 2013 11:58 By Ted Asregadoo, Truthout | Video Interview

Media

Truthout Interviews Featuring Candice Bernd on Whistleblowing Ted Asregadoo

Candice Bernd. (Screenshot: Truthout)Candice Bernd. (Screenshot: Truthout)Whistleblowers. They used to call them snitches, but as rock star whistleblowers Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden have demonstrated, whistleblowing is often a very brave thing to do. If your employer is doing something illegal or unethical, and if you have knowledge of said actions, but do nothing about it because you’re trying to hold on to your job or just don’t want to ruffle any feathers, then you are, at some level, sanctioning those illegal or unethical acts. To come forward and expose your employer’s wrongdoing is to risk your own career and possibly set yourself up for costly legal action.

In this “Truthout Interviews,” I spoke with Candice Bernd, who is an assistant editor and writer at Truthout, about the steps Congress is taking to protect whistleblowers from legal action by the federal government against those who blow the whistle on illegal or unethical actions by the government.

Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.

Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus