Truthout

  • William Rivers Pitt | "WTF Bombs?": Taking Back the Boston Marathon

    By William Rivers Pitt, Truthout | Op-Ed

    Remembering the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings in Copley Square of Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo: <a href=" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Remembering_the_victims_of_the_Marathon_Bombing-Copley_Square.jpg" target="_blank"> Ingfbruno / Wikimedia Commons</a>)Remembering the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings in Copley Square of Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo: Ingfbruno / Wikimedia Commons)

    The first hint that something had gone terribly wrong came via a text message on my phone. My friend David, an endurance runner with several other marathons under his belt, was running his first Boston Marathon, and it was a very big deal, because he is a Boston boy born and bred, and had come home to do this incredible thing we had grown up watching and cheering together.

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  • Arundhati Roy: Is India on a Totalitarian Path?

    Arundhati Roy: Is India on a Totalitarian Path?

    By Amy Goodman and Nermeen Shaikh, Democracy Now! | Video Interview

    As voting begins in India in the largest elections the world has ever seen, we spend the hour with Indian novelist and essayist Arundhati Roy. Nearly 815 million Indians are eligible to vote, and results will be issued in May. One of India’s most famous authors - and one of its fiercest critics - Roy is out with a new book, Capitalism: A Ghost Story, which dives into India’s transforming political landscape and makes the case that globalized capitalism has intensified the wealth divide, racism, and environmental degradation.

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  • Celebrating Resistance on the Anniversary of South Africa's First Democratic Vote

    Celebrating Resistance on the Anniversary of South Africa's First Democratic Vote

    By John Pilger, Truthout | Op-Ed

    On my wall in London is my favorite photograph from South Africa. Always thrilling to behold, it is Paul Weinberg's image of a lone woman standing between two armored vehicles, the infamous "hippos," as they rolled into Soweto. Her arms are raised, fists clenched, her thin body both beckoning and defiant of the enemy. On the 20th anniversary of the first democratic vote in South Africa, it is this resistance that should be celebrated.

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