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Powerful New Film Opens in New York

Thursday, 13 December 2012 12:02 By Richard D. Wolff, Democracy at Work | Press Release

Media

Let Fury Have The Hour Opening

In his feature directorial debut, author and visual artist Antonino D’Ambrosio spins a lively social history that chronicles how a generation of artists, thinkers, and activists channeled their creativity into an organized response and resistance to the reactionary politics that increasingly defined American culture in the 1980s. This idea of art as political statement came to be known as “creative response,” and, through insightful and energetic interviews with more than 50 influential creative voices, D’Ambrosio traces the movement from its earliest inklings in the Reagan-Thatcher era through three decades of social and political change. An exuberant mixed media collage that incorporates graphic art, music, animation, and spoken word, Let Fury Have The Hour is a distinctive perspective on an era in time, retelling the history of modern America through the voices of the artists that interpreted and influenced it through their work, including Shepard Fairey, Eve Ensler, Wayne Kramer, Edwidge Danticat, John Sayles, Chuck D, Tom Morello, Lewis Black, and dozens more. D’Ambrosio’s stylish and inspirational film pays due homage to the parallel creative history of late 20th-century America in the words and work of the artists themselves.
This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Richard D. Wolff

Richard D. Wolff is Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst where he taught economics from 1973 to 2008. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University, New York City. He also teaches classes regularly at the Brecht Forum in Manhattan. Earlier he taught economics at Yale University (1967-1969) and at the City College of the City University of New York (1969-1973). In 1994, he was a Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Paris (France), I (Sorbonne). His work is available at rdwolff.com and at democracyatwork.info.


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Powerful New Film Opens in New York

Thursday, 13 December 2012 12:02 By Richard D. Wolff, Democracy at Work | Press Release

Media

Let Fury Have The Hour Opening

In his feature directorial debut, author and visual artist Antonino D’Ambrosio spins a lively social history that chronicles how a generation of artists, thinkers, and activists channeled their creativity into an organized response and resistance to the reactionary politics that increasingly defined American culture in the 1980s. This idea of art as political statement came to be known as “creative response,” and, through insightful and energetic interviews with more than 50 influential creative voices, D’Ambrosio traces the movement from its earliest inklings in the Reagan-Thatcher era through three decades of social and political change. An exuberant mixed media collage that incorporates graphic art, music, animation, and spoken word, Let Fury Have The Hour is a distinctive perspective on an era in time, retelling the history of modern America through the voices of the artists that interpreted and influenced it through their work, including Shepard Fairey, Eve Ensler, Wayne Kramer, Edwidge Danticat, John Sayles, Chuck D, Tom Morello, Lewis Black, and dozens more. D’Ambrosio’s stylish and inspirational film pays due homage to the parallel creative history of late 20th-century America in the words and work of the artists themselves.
This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Richard D. Wolff

Richard D. Wolff is Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst where he taught economics from 1973 to 2008. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University, New York City. He also teaches classes regularly at the Brecht Forum in Manhattan. Earlier he taught economics at Yale University (1967-1969) and at the City College of the City University of New York (1969-1973). In 1994, he was a Visiting Professor of Economics at the University of Paris (France), I (Sorbonne). His work is available at rdwolff.com and at democracyatwork.info.


Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus