Wednesday, 26 November 2014 / TRUTH-OUT.ORG

From Science and Art, Global Warming is Real

Friday, 02 November 2012 13:14 By Jill S Schneiderman, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

So what if global warming isn’t directly responsible for “superstorm Sandy”? Let’s not get hung up on that minor detail.

Because the planet has warmed--the average surface temperature of the Earth rose 1.08°F to 1.62°F (0.6 to 0.9 °C) between 1906 and 2006-- the cryosphere has melted, moving H2O from the ice caps to the oceans.

Markers show the dramatic retreat of the Athabasca Glacier,

photo Judd Patterson

And seawater has literally expanded. As a result, sea level has risen—worldwide measurements of sea level show a rise of about 0.56 feet ((0.17 meters) during the twentieth century.

Earlier this week Hurricane Sandy pushed the sea onto land in coastal regions that are today more “low-lying” than they were a century ago. Images are still coming in of the devastation caused by such mass movement of water along parts of the northeastern coast. Earth behaved as predicted and revealed the increased risk to which we have subjected ourselves.

At a time when scientists have been convicted of not making good predictions may I be the first to congratulate Dr. Jianjun Yin, a climate modeler at the Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) at Florida State University, and colleagues Michael Schlesinger of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Ronald Stouffer of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Princeton University? In 2009 these folks published their analysis of data from ten state-of-the-art climate models and warned that, considering its population density and the potential socioeconomic consequences of such changes, the northeast coast of the U.S. is one of the areas most vulnerable to changes in sea level and ocean circulation.

 

Yin and his colleagues advised that, since much of the New York City metro region is less than 16 feet above mean sea level—with some parts of lower Manhattan only about 5 feet above it—a sea level rise of eight inches could be catastrophic. New York City would be at great risk, they added, for damage from hurricanes and winter storm surge (emphasis mine). Yin et al are the Hurricane Sandy analogs of scientists at Louisiana State University whose models of storm tracks led a reporter for Scientific American to presage in 2001 “New Orleans is a disaster waiting to happen.”

 

Yin’s study, "Model Projections of Rapid Sea-Level Rise on the Northeast Coast of the United States," produced this artist’s rendering of a flooded Manhattan.

 

But the images below are no artist’s rendering. They are photographs of water inundating the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s new South Ferry Terminal.



The trees and map along the walls are part of a site-specific art installation, See it Split, See it Change (2005-2008) made of fused glass, mosaic marble, and stainless steel by Doug and Mike Starn. The work of these artists has articulated themes of impermanence and transience.

 

Let’s heed the message from both science and art. Can we all just pay attention to the Earth?

 

 

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Jill S Schneiderman

Jill S. Schneiderman is professor of earth science at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. She teaches courses in earth science, environmental studies, gender studies, and history of science. She has edited and contributed to For the Rock Record: Geologists on Intelligent Design (University of California Press 2009) and The Earth Around Us: Maintaining a Livable Planet (Westview Press 2003). She blogs regularly at www.earthdharma.org.


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From Science and Art, Global Warming is Real

Friday, 02 November 2012 13:14 By Jill S Schneiderman, SpeakOut | Op-Ed

So what if global warming isn’t directly responsible for “superstorm Sandy”? Let’s not get hung up on that minor detail.

Because the planet has warmed--the average surface temperature of the Earth rose 1.08°F to 1.62°F (0.6 to 0.9 °C) between 1906 and 2006-- the cryosphere has melted, moving H2O from the ice caps to the oceans.

Markers show the dramatic retreat of the Athabasca Glacier,

photo Judd Patterson

And seawater has literally expanded. As a result, sea level has risen—worldwide measurements of sea level show a rise of about 0.56 feet ((0.17 meters) during the twentieth century.

Earlier this week Hurricane Sandy pushed the sea onto land in coastal regions that are today more “low-lying” than they were a century ago. Images are still coming in of the devastation caused by such mass movement of water along parts of the northeastern coast. Earth behaved as predicted and revealed the increased risk to which we have subjected ourselves.

At a time when scientists have been convicted of not making good predictions may I be the first to congratulate Dr. Jianjun Yin, a climate modeler at the Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) at Florida State University, and colleagues Michael Schlesinger of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Ronald Stouffer of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Princeton University? In 2009 these folks published their analysis of data from ten state-of-the-art climate models and warned that, considering its population density and the potential socioeconomic consequences of such changes, the northeast coast of the U.S. is one of the areas most vulnerable to changes in sea level and ocean circulation.

 

Yin and his colleagues advised that, since much of the New York City metro region is less than 16 feet above mean sea level—with some parts of lower Manhattan only about 5 feet above it—a sea level rise of eight inches could be catastrophic. New York City would be at great risk, they added, for damage from hurricanes and winter storm surge (emphasis mine). Yin et al are the Hurricane Sandy analogs of scientists at Louisiana State University whose models of storm tracks led a reporter for Scientific American to presage in 2001 “New Orleans is a disaster waiting to happen.”

 

Yin’s study, "Model Projections of Rapid Sea-Level Rise on the Northeast Coast of the United States," produced this artist’s rendering of a flooded Manhattan.

 

But the images below are no artist’s rendering. They are photographs of water inundating the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s new South Ferry Terminal.



The trees and map along the walls are part of a site-specific art installation, See it Split, See it Change (2005-2008) made of fused glass, mosaic marble, and stainless steel by Doug and Mike Starn. The work of these artists has articulated themes of impermanence and transience.

 

Let’s heed the message from both science and art. Can we all just pay attention to the Earth?

 

 

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license. It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source.

Jill S Schneiderman

Jill S. Schneiderman is professor of earth science at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. She teaches courses in earth science, environmental studies, gender studies, and history of science. She has edited and contributed to For the Rock Record: Geologists on Intelligent Design (University of California Press 2009) and The Earth Around Us: Maintaining a Livable Planet (Westview Press 2003). She blogs regularly at www.earthdharma.org.


Hide Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus