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JANE STILLWATER FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

FloodJava2A Flood on JavaIt seems to me that the reason we get global warming in some places and global cooling in others should be as plain as the nose on your face -- at least to those of us who live in Berkeley.

Whenever it gets hot in Walnut Creek, over the hill from Berkeley, we always get a strong wind here as our own cooler air rushes over to balance out Walnut Creek's hotspots.

So global warming and cooling should clearly work in the same way -- except on a planetary scale. As Florida really heats up, for instance, cold air from the Arctic should rush in to balance temperatures out. And hurricanes and tornadoes appear to be getting bigger and nastier here to compensate for temperature changes somewhere else. All over the planet, increased warm areas are being balanced out by increased cold areas -- and vice-versa. That's my new climate-change theory and I'm sticking to it.

And Justice works the same way as well. We gotta have liberty and justice for all -- and not just for Poobahs and cartels. Because if we don't, it's all going to even out in the end eventually -- one way or another.

Everyone everywhere keeps track of these things.

And when justice only goes to the wealthy and not to the poor, things definitely get hotter in one spot and cooler in another.

Thursday, 30 January 2014 07:55

Abolishing War, Resurrecting Fallujah

ROBERT C. KOEHLER FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

MarinesFallujahIraq vet Ross Caputi's film opens with a fleeting synopsis of the American heartbreak — and the bandage we tape across it.

His documentary, Fear Not the Path of Truth, is about the U.S. devastation of Fallujah, in which he participated as part of Operation Phantom Fury in November 2004, but the first couple minutes give us an overview of his hometown, the "former industrial city" of Fitchburg, Mass.:

"But the factory jobs are long gone, so there's really only two types of people that live here. They're the people with good-paying jobs in Boston or Worcester who come out here to build big houses at relatively cheap prices. Everyone else gets by doing work on those houses, doing their lawns, putting additions on them, painting them.

"If there was a point of unity among all the racial and economic divisions in this little city, it had to be the troops. Everyone respected the troops."

I was struck especially hard by this small moment because it encapsulates the lie of militarism where it is most invulnerable: at the humanity of the men and women who protect us, putting their lives on the line. When all else goes wrong, the troops remain sacred. In a broken economy, the troops are sacred. Militarism is the god we can manipulate.

And yet the moment to expel this lie from human society has never been riper. The trans-national cost of militarism is some $2 trillion a year, according to an ambitious new website called World Beyond War. The insanity of war not only squanders our resources, ravages the environment and slaughters the innocent, it perpetuates a global culture of violence, which is the very thing we honor our troops for protecting us from.

MARK KARLIN, EDITOR OF BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

allunch433811697 bba2362bba n(photo:bookgrl)Talk about stealing candy from a baby!

At an elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah, a nutritionist had the lunches of all children who owed money for food put in the garbage.  This was after the students had already received their trays with meals.

According to The Salt Lake Tribune:

Up to 40 kids at Uintah Elementary in Salt Lake City picked up their lunches Tuesday, then watched as the meals were taken and thrown away because of outstanding balances on their accounts — a move that shocked and angered parents.

"It was pretty traumatic and humiliating," said Erica Lukes, whose 11-year-old daughter had her cafeteria lunch taken from her as she stood in line Tuesday at Uintah Elementary School, 1571 E. 1300 South.

Now maybe some parents were behind in payments because they are un-employed or under-employed, but what kind of nation is this that literally rips lunches out of the hands of grade school students?

2014.1.29.AngryBirds.BFROBERT SCHEER ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Somewhere in the lowest reaches of hell, Adolf Hitler and his coterie of lesser dictators must be tormented by the knowledge they did not live long enough to get their hands on "Angry Birds." How much diabolical power they would have had, not playing the game, but rather mining the data freely volunteered by its billion unsuspecting customers.

"When a smartphone user opens 'Angry Birds,' the popular game application, and starts slinging birds at chortling green pigs, spy agencies have plotted how to lurk in the background to snatch data revealing the player's location, age, sex and other personal information ..." The New York Times reported, based on the latest of Edward Snowden's leaks.

No need then for the Gestapo to go crashing through apartment doors to brutally interrogate citizens as to the most guarded moments of their personal lives when a vast amount of private information from gaming, mapping and social networking sites is pirated by the government. No totalitarian leader could ever imagine such surveillance power over his populace.

Dinesh D'Souza speaking at the 2013 FreedomFest in Las Vegas, Nevada.Dinesh D'Souza speaking at the 2013 FreedomFest in Las Vegas, Nevada.BILL BERKOWITZ FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

On Thursday, January 23, a press release from the United States Attorney's Office, Southern District of New York announced "an Indictment charging DINESH D'SOUZA with violating the federal campaign finance laws by making illegal contributions to a United States Senate campaign in the names of others and causing false statements to be made to the Federal Election Commission in connection with those contributions." (U.S. v. D'Souza, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, No. 14-cr-00034.)

The last time we encountered D'Souza, he had resigned as president of Kings College, a small Christian college in New York City, over some extracurricular lovey-dovey stuff with a woman (who was not his wife) at a right-wing conference called "Truth for a New Generation?"

Before that, D'Souza, a right-wing author, pundit and filmmaker, was raking in the dough with his scathing take on President Obama in his documentary titled 2016: Obama's America. The film, which was released prior to the 2012 presidential election and was aimed at providing enough ammunition to defeat Obama, failed politically but was a box office sensation, bringing in over $33 million. It became the fourth highest grossing documentary of all time, and the second most popular political documentary, trailing only Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 by some $80 million.

MARK KARLIN, EDITOR OF BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

amoneyAddictions of any sort are an indication that people cannot control a facet of their lives.  The insatiable desire to acquire unlimited wealth falls into the category of addictions, according to Sam Polk, in a recent New York Times opinion piece.

Polk writes from experience, having walked away with a $3.6 million Wall Street bonus in 2010.  He is still, he admits, going through withdrawal from greed.  He writes of his unquenchable avariciousness when he was in the midst of his addiction:

Now, working elbow to elbow with billionaires, I was a giant fireball of greed. I’d think about how my colleagues could buy Micronesia if they wanted to, or become mayor of New York City. They didn’t just have money; they had power — power beyond getting a table at Le Bernardin. Senators came to their offices. They were royalty.

I wanted a billion dollars. It’s staggering to think that in the course of five years, I’d gone from being thrilled at my first bonus — $40,000 — to being disappointed when, my second year at the hedge fund, I was paid “only” $1.5 million.

STEVEN JONAS MD, MPH FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

ConfederateSurrenderOn February 20, 1864 there was a First Civil War battle at a place in Florida called Olustee. It was not a major battle. It rates half a sentence in the monumental 900 page history of the First Civil War and the major events that led up to it from the beginning of the 19th century by James McPherson. The title of his book, Battle Cry of Freedom, was a slogan interestingly enough, used on both sides, obviously with different meanings: on one side it meant an end to slavery, on the other the freedom to maintain it.

The book is still widely considered to be the best single volume history of the conflict. But now, 150 years after event, that particular battle, which drew so little mention in Prof. McPherson's book, is still front and center in the minds of some and (so far only) figuratively, the battle rages on. It, in which significant numbers of African-American troops fought for the Union side, ended with a Confederate victory.

It happens that there is a three acre Florida state park at the site, which contains three memorials to the Confederate dead. The Florida chapter of an organization called the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War petitioned to have a memorial to the Union dead erected on the site as well. This petition brought forth a very strong objection from the Florida branch of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

One of their number, ironically named John Adams, stated the reason for the opposition was that "old grudges die hard." You bet your sweet pitootie they do. Here we are, 150 years later, and those sons of Confederate veterans, including the chairman of the Florida House Judiciary Committee, one Dennis Baxley (ironically [R]), cannot stand to have Union dead honored on the same site that their dead are, because of an "old grudge."

Although he didn't say (or least the New York Times article cited didn't quote him saying anything on the subject), the "old grudge" must have to do with the fact that after 11 Southern states seceded from the Union over one or more aspects of the slavery issue, and one of their number opened fire on a Federal fort in the harbor of Charleston, S.C., a civil war ensued, which the Secessionist forces lost. My-oh-my. 150 years later. Couldn't be that many of the issues over which the First Civil War was fought are still at issue, plus a number of new ones, now could it?

MARK KARLIN, EDITOR AT BUZZFLASH

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areich56According to Robert Reich, in a blog entry earlier this month, 2013 was a banner year for the wealthy, as the trickle up of income and asseets continued to gallup along. Reich calls 2013 "the year of the great income redistribution [upward]":

One of the worst epithets that can be leveled at a politician these days is to call him a “redistributionist.” Yet 2013 marked one of the biggest redistributions in recent American history. It was a redistribution upward, from average working people to the owners of America.

The stock market ended 2013 at an all-time high — giving stockholders their biggest annual gain in almost two decades. Most Americans didn’t share in those gains, however, because most people haven’t been able to save enough to invest in the stock market. More than two-thirds of Americans live from paycheck to paycheck.

Even if you include the value of IRA’s, most shares of stock are owned by the very wealthy. The richest 1 percent of Americans owns 35 percent of the value of American-owned shares. The richest 10 percent owns over 80 percent. So in the bull market of 2013, America’s rich hit the jackpot.

Have you hit the jackpot in the last year as income and assets continue a decades-long redistribution to the top? Not me. For 90% of America, we are hitting the bills, not a Las Vegas mega-payoff.

EUGENE ROBINSON ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

IciclesAnother insane cold wave -- not the infamous "polar vortex," but its evil twin -- is bringing sub-zero and single-digit temperatures to much of the nation. And global warming may be even more extreme, and potentially more catastrophic, than climate scientists had feared.

This is, of course, no contradiction. The rallying cry of the denialists -- "It's really cold outside, so global warming must be a crock!" -- can only be taken seriously by those with a toddler's limited conception of time and space. They forget that it's winter, and apparently they don't quite grasp that even when it's cold in one part of the world, it can be hot in another.

Indeed, while the United States is having an unusually frigid month, Australia has been sweltering through record-breaking heat. Play had to be interrupted at the Australian Open tennis tournament when temperatures in Melbourne reached 109 degrees; one player said her plastic water bottle began to melt. The extreme heat came as officials reported that 2013 was the hottest year in Australia since record-keeping began more than a century ago.

On the global scale, 2013 was "merely" the fourth-warmest or seventh-warmest on record, depending whether you believe the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The agencies take slightly different approaches in analyzing and extrapolating the available data, which accounts for the discrepancy, but they agree on the big picture: It's getting hotter.

Nine of the 10 warmest years on record have occurred since 2002. Deniers who claim there has been a 15-year "pause" in global warming are cherry-picking the data to fit a pre-cooked conclusion: As a baseline they choose 1998, a year in which global temperatures took a huge, anomalous, one-time leap. If you treat 1998 as the statistical outlier that it obviously is, you see a steady and unbroken rise.

2014.1.27.Gates.BFBill Gates PAUL BUCHHEIT FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

The top individuals on the 2013 Forbes 400 list are generally believed to be makers of great companies or concepts. They are the role models of Paul Ryan, who laments, "We're going to a majority of takers versus makers in America." They are defended by Cato Institute CEO John A. Allison IV, who once protested: "Instead of an attack on the 1 percent, let's call it an attack on the very productive."

But many of the richest Americans are takers. The top twenty, with a total net worth of almost two-thirds of a trillion dollars, have all taken from the public or from employees, or through taxes or untaxed inheritances.


Bill Gates

Bill Gates may be a knowledgeable and hard-working man, but he was also lucky and opportunistic. He was a taker. In 1975, at the age of 20, he founded Microsoft with high school buddy Paul Allen. This was the era of the first desktop computers, and numerous small companies were trying to program them, most notably Digital Research, headed by brilliant software designer Gary Kildall. His CP/M operating system (OS) was the industry standard. Even Gates' company used it.

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