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A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION

Martha Rosenberg is a Staff Cartoonist for the Evanston Roundtable.

 

Friday, 27 February 2009 02:54

Martha Rosenberg: The month in shame

 

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION

Martha Rosenberg is a Staff Cartoonist for the Evanston Roundtable.

 

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
by Martha Rosenberg

Chicago, IL -- Global warming and our "absurd over-dependence on carbon-based fuels" is interconnected with the looming economic and national security crises, said former Vice President Al Gore to an overflow audience at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Chicago in February.

It's also connected to the rise in antibiotic resistant strains of deadly sea-born bacteria, said scientists at a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) sponsored event at the AAAS meeting.

Seafood collected from three locations on the U.S. southeast coast showed striking levels of antibiotic resistant Vibrio parahaemolyticus, related to cholera and Vibrio vulnificus, which can kill in 72 hours, reported Ramunas Stephanauskas, PhD from the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science in West Boothbay Harbor, ME.

The increasing risk of Death on the Half Shell -- resistance was found with  aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, and cephalosporins, according to Stephanauskas -- is caused by a coastal water toxic soup of metal contamination and livestock runoff potentiated by global warming.

Nor do you want to bathe in the water, said Lisa Plano, MD a pediatrician and microbiologist with the University of Miami's Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine at the same workshop.

Monday, 02 February 2009 04:15

Martha Rosenberg: Pfizer/Wyeth wedding

 

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION

Martha Rosenberg is a Staff Cartoonist for the Evanston Roundtable.

 

photo credit Agence France-Presse

The ultimate Bush memorial is now in Iraq: a statue of a shoe in Tikrit, hometown of the late Saddam Hussein.

It's large, bronze, and a fitting tribute to the shoes thrown at Bush in his waning days. 

And while it was just announced that the shoe was coming down (some democracy that is), we still want to honor its memory.

Normally, in Caption This, we ask to say what the person is thinking. But here we have a shoe. So you have to pretend the shoe can talk.

But what would the shoe say if it could speak?

"I am finely crafted and I have to be associated with this clown." "Try throwing a huge bronze shoe at Bush." "Unlike Bush, I at least have sole."

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
by Martha Rosenberg

If 100 million Americans have high cholesterol and only 8 million have schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, how can AstraZeneca's Seroquel, not its cholesterol pill Crestor, be its second best selling pill?

Right after its number one pill, the Purple Performer Nexium? Can anyone say disease mongering?

For years, AstraZeneca has tried to convince depressed people they are really bipolar and need to take the atypical antipsychotic Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate), which is only approved for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

"Is It Really Depression or Could It Be Bipolar Disorder?" trumpet the ads, urging unaware victims to take a Symptom Quiz and find out how sick they really are.

Full color spreads run in general interest magazines showing a rampaging woman her mouth contorted -- think female Dark Knight -- asking readers, is this you?

"Are there periods of time when you have racing thoughts? Fly off the handle at little things? Spend out of control? Need less sleep? Feel irritable? You may need treatment for bipolar disorder."

Now the FDA says AstraZeneca can not -- repeat not -- market Seroquel for depression. In December the FDA denied approval of Seroquel for major depressive disorder and asked the company instead for more information in a complete response letter (CRL).

Oops.

 

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION

Martha Rosenberg is a Staff Cartoonist for the Evanston Roundtable.

 

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
by Martha Rosenberg

Condoleezza Rice finally lost her temper.

When Michele Keleman from National Public Radio asked the outgoing Secretary of State if Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe's discussion of human rights at the UN made it more difficult for her to talk about human rights, she exploded.  

"To mention Robert Mugabe in the same sentence with the President of the United States is an outrage," she admonished in the December interview. 

"Robert Mugabe is simply trying to cover the fact that he's taken a country which was once one of the jewels of Africa, made it into a center of starvation and now of rampant disease that threatens its neighbors. And no, we shouldn't fall prey to any kind of moral relativism here. We ought to call it as we see it." 

You can't blame Rice for simmering. 

With all the Election '08 talk about "firsts" for women and African-Americans and glass ceilings, what about her? 

She was not the first female U.S. Secretary of State but she certainly was the first African American one. And she was certainly the first to brave diplomatic waters where a woman's hand outstretched for a handshake puts terror in the hearts of ruling male supremacists. 

 

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
by Martha Rosenberg

Martha Rosenberg is a Staff Cartoonist for the Evanston Roundtable.

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
by Martha Rosenberg

Posing for photographers with her felled caribou, her child inches from its bleeding mouth, Sarah Life-Is-Precious Palin is not confused about where meat comes from.

So the turkey being slaughtered in full view of the camera as she conducted an interview at Triple D Farms in Wasilla this week probably doesn't phase her.

But most Americans don't want to see the transformations their turkey went through to get to their Thanksgiving dinner table.

How it lived, how it was shipped, who hung the struggling bird upside down on the conveyer to transport it to the awaiting blade, et al -- are not thoughts that improve the taste of the cranberry sauce.

Nor will the economy get so bad that people will have to take jobs as "live hangers" such as Sam, not his real name, last year.

"Today I saw about 50 dead turkeys on the trucks, and about 80 live birds fell onto the floor," he writes in a diary he kept while working at House of Raeford Farms in Raeford, NC, the seventh largest turkey producer in the U.S.

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