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LORRAINE CHOW OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Pipe 1122wrp opt(Photo: Loozrboy / Flickr)TransCanada's permit to operate its Keystone tar sands pipeline in South Dakota could be revoked if an investigation into last week's 210,000-gallon leak determines that the pipeline operator violated its license, Reuters reported.

State regulators expressed concern that the Nov. 16 spill in Marshall County was not the first from the controversial pipeline.

"This is a relatively new pipeline. It is supposed to have an operating life of more than 100 years and it was supposed to be a state-of-the-art pipeline construction. It appears that it is not," South Dakota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) member Gary Hanson told Aberdeen News.

"We've had three fairly major leaks just on the border with North Dakota and two in South Dakota in a very short period of time," Hanson added. "One might expect this to take place on a pipeline over a period of 30 or 40 years at the maximum, yet it's been fewer than 10 years."

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LORRAINE CHOW OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Change 1121wrp opt(Photo: Judd McCullum / Flickr)As someone who writes about the environment on a near-daily basis, the fact that a large chunk of Americans (about one in eight) reject the near scientific consensus of climate change can be a tough pill to swallow.

But after a year of record-breaking heatwaves, massive wildfires in the west, and a string of destructive hurricanes, it appears that my fellow U.S. citizens are waking up to the realities of our hot, new world, according to the latest nationally representative survey from the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication.

The poll, which has tracked Americans' attitudes about climate since 2008, revealed an uptick in Americans' concern about climate change, including "substantial increases" in the certainty that the global phenomenon is happening and currently harming people in the U.S.

The survey, based on the replies of 1,304 adults between Oct. 20 to Nov. 1, showed that seven in ten participants think climate change is happening—an increase of eight percentage points since March 2015. The good news is that those who think global warming is real outnumber climate deniers by more than 5 to 1.

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JIM HIGHTOWER ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Duterte 1121wrp optRodrigo Duterte portait. (Photo: thierry ehrmann / Flickr)"We've had a great relationship," exulted a giddy Donald Trump, following his two-day schmoozefest in Manila with the thuggish president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte.

Duterte, a self-styled "toughie" who boasts of personally killing many people and who likes to compare himself to Satan, has been on a murderous rampage since his election last year. In the name of eliminating drugs, he has unleashed a massive military assault across the country, not merely targeting dealers, but also anyone using drugs. His onslaught against his own people is a human rights atrocity, with untold thousands essentially being executed in what are antiseptically termed "extrajudicial killings" — ie, illegal, unjustified... murderous.

Yet, the present President of the United States says Duterte is his new buddy, and Trump stressed in their official discussions that the Philippine president can count on him and the U.S. (which includes you and me) to be a friend. And, as a friend, Trump didn't bother his authoritarian buddy with any unpleasant talk about those rampant human rights abuses.

Instead, the Duterte-Trump get-together was one of mutual praise and even affection. Indeed, Donald was delighted when Rodrigo impulsively grabbed the microphone at a gala state dinner and serenaded Trump with a love ballad: "You are the love I've been waiting for," he crooned.

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BILL BERKOWITZ FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Betsy 1120wrp optBetsy DeVos at CPAC. (Photo: Gage Skidmore / Flickr)This is being written before a final vote has been taken on President Trump's higher-taxes-for-the-middle-class-and-the-poor bill has been voted on, so as of now, there hasn't been much in the way of legislation for the Trump administration to hang its hat on. But downstream, there are lots of awful things underway. To paraphrase an old Henny Youngman tag line: Take the work of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. … Please!

In her first few months as secretary, the Michigan billionaire, DeVos, who needed the vote of vice-president Mike Pence to break the tie in the Senate over her confirmation, has been involved in several controversial battles over the implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act, Title IX, guns in the schools, rolling back regulations on the for-profit college industry, and her efforts to shrink the Dept. of Education.

According to The Washington Post's Moriah Balingit and Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, "The department's workforce has shrunk under … DeVos, who has said she wants to decrease the federal government's role in education, including investigations and enforcement of civil rights in schools. In all, the department has shed about 350 workers since December — nearly 8 percent of its staff — including political appointees. With buyouts offered to 255 employees in recent days, DeVos hopes to show even more staff the door."

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PAUL BUCHHEIT FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

OnePercent 1120wrp opt(Photo: Kate Ausburn / Flickr)Inequality, like a malignant tumor, is growing out of control, and the only response from Congress is to make it even worse. Those at the richest end of the nation seem to have lost all capacity for understanding the meaning and values of an interdependent society. They've convinced themselves that they deserve their passively accumulated windfalls, and that poorer people have only themselves to blame for their own misfortunes. 

It's Getting Uglier Every Year

The average 1% household made nearly $2.6 million in the 12 months to mid-2017. Mostly from the stock market. Here's how: 

- The U.S. increased its wealth by over $8.5 trillion (see Table 2-4, mid-2016 to mid-2017). 

- The 1% took $3.27 trillion of that (38.3 percent: see Table 6-5). 

- Each of 1.26 million households, on average, took nearly $2.6 million. In greater detail, the poor segment of the 1% averaged about $1.44 million for the year, the .1% averaged about $7.2 million, and the .01% (12,600 households) averaged nearly $65 million in just the past year.

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BILL BERKOWITZ FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Cow 1117wrp opt(Photo: Jelle / Flickr)To be perfectly honest, most of us would be hard-pressed to have a handle on the range of the myriad of functions of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We would likely get the part about meat and poultry inspections, and maybe the fact that the agency oversees the food stamp program, but otherwise we would be pretty unclear about the scope of the agency's work. As Michael Lewis reports in the December issue of Vanity Fair, most of what the USDA does "has little to do with agriculture," as it spends only a "small fraction" of its $164 billion budget (2016) on farmers.

Among other things, the USDA "runs 193 million acres of natural forest and grasslands [and] It is charged with inspecting almost all the animals people eat." The agency runs a "massive science program; a bank with $220 billion in assets; plus a large fleet of aircraft for firefighting," There's more; it finances and manages numerous programs in rural America, "including the free school lunch for kids living near the poverty line."

A Vanity Fair USDA Organizational Chart has the Secretary and Deputy Secretary up top, and seven Undersecretaries: National Resources and Environment; Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services; Rural Development; Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services; Food Safety; Research, Education and Economics (Science); and, Marketing and Regulatory Programs.

 

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DR. HAKIM YOUNG FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Piling 1115wrp optDigging a well in Kabul. (Photo: Dr. Hakim Young)"My family's water well has dried up," 18-year-old Surkh Gul said.

"Ours too," echoed 13-year-old Inaam.

A distressed Surkh Gul lamented, "We have to fetch water from the public well along the main road, but that water is muddy, not fit for drinking. I get bottled water for my two-year-old daughter. At least someone in the family should stay healthy."

Inaam chipped in, "Fortunately, for now, the water that we fetch from a nearby mosque is clean."

A U.S. and Afghan Geological Survey of Kabul Basin's water resources found that about half of the shallow groundwater supply wells could become dry by 2050 due to declining recharge and stream-flows under projected climate change.

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EMERSON URRY OF ENVIRONEWS ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Radioactive 1115wrp opt(Photo: Reyhan Dhuny / Flickr)An airborne plume of radioactive ruthenium 106 from a nuclear accident was detected "in the atmosphere of the majority of European countries," from late September through mid-October, according to France's Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute (IRSN) — but the source is still unknown. As of November 10, 2017, the manmade element has been identified in at least 28 countries.

While many news agencies are calling the cloud "harmless" and reporting the good news — that radiation levels are low and that no health consequences have been observed — radiation experts tell EnviroNews the scene may not be so peachy at ground zero where the release occurred. The question is: where exactly is ground zero?

In a report, the IRSN used wind and weather patterns, coupled with readouts from radiation monitoring stations throughout Europe, to deduce the "most plausible zone of release lies between the [Volga River] and the [Ural Mountains]." According to NPR, Jean-Christophe Gariel, Director for Health at the IRSN, said, the plume "has been traced to somewhere along the Russia-Kazakhstan border."

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HASSAN EL-TAYYAB FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Missile 1114wrp opt(Photo: Farrukh / Flickr)The escalating war of words between Trump and Kim Jong-un has put the world in more imminent danger of nuclear holocaust than at any time since the end of the Cold War. The US should revisit a vital proposal, known as the "freeze for freeze" approach, which offers the best hope for jump starting diplomacy with North Korea and turning our nation back from the brink.

Under this proposal, the US and South Korea would freeze their joint military exercises in the region in exchange for North Korea freezing its testing of ballistic missiles and nuclear warheads. This would achieve highly desirable goals for both nations, namely assurances for the US that North Korea is not making progress towards a nuclear-tipped ICBM that can reliably strike the US mainland, and assurances for North Korea that the US and South Korea are not preparing for war.

North Korea has already voiced willingness to consider a "freeze for freeze" approach. During a June 21 interview, North Korean Ambassador Key Chun-yong explained that "Under certain circumstances, we are willing to talk in terms of freezing nuclear testing or missile testing. For instance, if the American side completely stops big, large-scale military exercises temporarily or permanently, then we will also temporarily stop." Russia and Germany have also voiced support this proposal, as have American nuclear policy experts like former Secretary of Defense William Perry.

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LORRAINE CHOW OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Lineman 1113wrp optPhoto: Cara / Flickr)Whitefish Energy, the controversial energy firm repairing Puerto Rico's hurricane-wrecked power grid, is under fresh scrutiny for charging the island's power authority hundreds of dollars more per hour than its linemen receive.

The New York Times reported that the tiny Montana-based company—which doesn't have many of its own employees—contracted electrical workers from Florida at rates that range from $42 to $100 per hour, with an average rate of $63. Whitefish, however, has been charging the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) $319 an hour for each worker.

The Times pointed out that $319 per hour is wildly above the industry standard, even for emergency work. Notably, the rate is 17 times higher than what it would have cost to hire a lineman in Puerto Rico.

Whitefish spokesman Chris Chiames defended its costs to the newspaper, explaining that "simply looking at the rate differential does not take into account Whitefish's overhead costs" built into the rate.

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