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STEVEN JONAS MD, MPH FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaCheneyII(Photo: Cherie A. Thurlby)In Part 1 of this two-part series, I briefly reviewed what are perhaps the four most significant elements of the "Cheney Legacy:" the War on Afghanistan, the War on Iraq, the principle that Presidents can violate the Constitution at their pleasure as long as they claim to do so "in the interests of national security" (in Cheney's case through the establishment of the use of torture as national policy such use violates Article VI), and also most important, the attempt to establish Permanent War or at least the Permanent Preparation for Permanent War as the central element of US government policy.

There are certainly other elements in the "Cheney Legacy." Not particularly in order of importance, one could start the list with the "outing" of the former CIA agent Valerie Plame. This was done in apparent retaliation for the revelation by her husband, Joseph Wilson, that the Nigeria-"Yellow Cake-Saddam Hussein story was a complete fabrication. Committing such an act violated several laws, but of course Cheney hid behind subordinates like "Scooter" Libby and was never held to account for his action. The continued use of the 9/11 tragedy to promote fear over the whole country. In his current attack on President Obama Cheney is specifically use fear-mongering as a central element in that attack.

Then there are the current top-three GOP-termed "scandals:" the "IRS," the VA (which is a scandal, but just not how the GOP defines the term), and of course "Benghazi." The three attacks have in common the use of lies and distortions designed to attack the opposition political party, not to find any solutions to the problems raised. Finally there is the Cheney principle of the Privatization of Government, including or perhaps beginning with the military and intelligence services. Any way that traditional government can be turned to enable profit-making by the private sector is, in Cheney's eyes a good thing. One of the ironies of that policy is that if Edward Snowden had remained as a government employee rather than working for a private intelligence contractor, it is possible that he might have a) not decided to make the revelations that he has, and b) might not have had the opportunity to do so.

JACQUELINE MARCUS FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaFirstAmendmentZone(Photo: Brandt Luke Zorn)While Americans were watching fireworks explode on the 4th, and laboring under the sad delusion that the United States is the land of the free and the brave, I was thinking about the recent Supreme Court ruling on the Massachusetts’ abortion buffer zone law and how some people are free to petition their grievances while anti-war demonstrators, Occupy Wall Street protesters, and environmentalists are either locked away behind chain-link cages designated “free speech zones”, or they’re violently assaulted by the police and thrown in jail. 

Recently, the Supreme Court unanimously struck down Massachusetts’ abortion buffer zone law, ruling in favor of anti-abortion protesters who argued that 35 feet away from clinic entrances is a violation of their freedom of speech. The decision rolls back a proactive policy intended to protect women’s access to reproductive health care in the face of persistent harassment and intimidation from abortion opponents.

As reporters have pointed out, buffer zones are not entirely unusual policies. “There are already buffer zones around funerals and polling places,” explained Tara Culp-Ressler at ThinkProgress.  “Ironically, the Supreme Court itself has a large buffer zone around it to prevent protesters from picketing on its 252-by-98-foot plaza, requiring demonstrations to take place on the sidewalk.” 

And let’s not forget the largest buffer zone of all: The White House, which is more like a military fortress than the People’s House.  

On closer inspection of the ruling, it appears that there is a catchword that can be applied to defend protesters, should protesters want to get right in the face of their adversaries; and that word is “counseling” vs. “picketing or protesting.”

ROBERT C. KOEHLER FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaRepLewis(Photo: Rep. John Lewis (D-GA))Ah, 1961. The year — certain aspects of it, anyway — are almost impossible to remember. "Whites only" bathrooms, for instance.

U.S. Rep. John Lewis, legendary civil rights leader and crosser of lines, recently tweeted an ancient mugshot memorializing his arrest that year for using a "whites only" bathroom in Mississippi and, in the process, amping up outrage against Jim Crow segregation in the South and intensifying the civil rights movement's global resonance.

He was charged with disorderly conduct and spent 37 days at the Parchman Penitentiary. How difficult it is to fathom such smug, legally sanctified certainty. It all seems so long ago . . . those days when the people who ran things were so wrong.

I say this facetiously, of course.

The emergence of this mugshot from 53 years ago, and the memories of a long-gone era that unavoidably accompany it, somehow speaks volumes to the numerous movements for change that are simmering today. One reason is because the civil rights movement of the 1960s was actually successful. It turned the country around. It undid every last legal and moral justification that held together a whites-only Old South, and it seriously undermined much of the legally ensconced racism of the North.

No, it didn't end racism per se, which regrouped "legally" around a bloated prison-industrial complex, but it woke the nation up and created an enduring legacy of nonviolent, human-rights-based change. It set a standard for what's possible, at the same time exposing the vicious hatred, masquerading as moral sanctity, which held together the existing social order.

Pope Francis. (Photo:<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/catholicism/8723849140/in/photolist-ehMqqt-ehNao2-ehTiBA-ehNvAH-ehUbgU-ehNnC6-ehT9Jq-ehNbSi-ehN2Ne-ehU1q5-ehMvKr-ehTE5Q-ehT5iS-ehTMeC-ehTGrJ-ehTzr5-ec7Aoq-ehN9wT-ehTkJb-ehMMXR-ehMyMa-ehUotb-ehTpxd-ehTkx3-ehU4iu-ehN7Uk-ehTPgC-ehTACL-ehTbVf-ehTut1-ehNxH8-ehNwgP-ehTX35-ehTgKm-ehN8UZ-ehUer1-ehTy9q-ehTJ3W-ehToom-ehMFBT-ehN1UR-ehMSFr-ehTHpS-ehNz92-ehUaK7-ehNfNk-ehNqmv-ehNcDK-ec1TFn-ehTiSG" target="_blank"> Catholic Church England and Wales / Flickr</a>)Pope Francis. (Photo: Catholic Church England and Wales / Flickr)ECOWATCH STAFF ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

Pope Francis called for more respect for nature in an address at the University of Molise, an agricultural region in southern Italy.

Francis said the destruction of South America’s rain forests and other forms of environmental exploitation is a sin of modern times.

“This is one of the greatest challenges of our time: to convert ourselves to a type of development that knows how to respect creation,” he told students and farmers while speaking in a university hall on Saturday.

The Earth should be allowed to give her fruits without being exploited, Francis said.

The flags of a Three Percenter. (Photo: @mjb / Flickr)The flags of a Three Percenter. (Photo: @mjb / Flickr)BILL BERKOWITZ FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

"You see an illegal. You point your gun dead at him, right between his eyes, and you say, 'Get back across the border or you will be shot.'" – Chris Davis, head of "Secure our Border – Laredo Sector."

Chris Davis, a man who over the past few years has been deeply involved with the armed-wing of the far right, is calling for militia members to grab their guns and head for the border. Although Davis is claiming that his new project is aimed at drug cartels and gangs, it is not especially far-fetched to consider that Davis might be looking for a Cliven Bundy moment; making a name for himself by leading a platoon of armed militia members to confront the women and children from Central America crossing the Texas-Mexico border.

Over the July 4th holiday weekend, Karen Antonacci reported in the Brownsville Herald that a group calling itself "'Patriots' has put out a call for people to go to the Texas-Mexico border and help with a citizen militia operation called 'Secure our Border - Laredo.'"

Davis' vigilante project comes despite assurances from Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Gil Kerlikowske, who recently told ABC News' Jim Avila that the Central Americans crossing the US border – now numbering 50,000 -- "are not dangerous individuals," nor a threat to national security.

It also comes against the backdrop of anti-immigrant activists in Murrieta, California, who received national attention after they forced US government buses full of the undocumented children to divert.

BILL BERKOWITZ FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaArkansasProject(Photo: Wasted Time R)Long before the billionaire Koch Brothers and casino magnate Sheldon Adelson began polluting the American political landscape with obscene amounts of money, decades before the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, years before the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth mobilized a platoon of millionaire financiers to put the kibosh on John Kerry's presidential campaign, and before folks like Rex Sinquefield were bound and determined to have their money loom large over the legislative process in the states, there was Richard Mellon Scaife.

During the 1970s and 1980s, Scaife and his family were among the top donors to a myriad of right-wing organizations and causes. Back in the day it didn't take long before researchers following the money behind the conservative movement ran headlong into the Scaife clan.

Scaife, the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-based heir to the Mellon banking fortune, was a man on a multi-pronged mission. He succeeded in helping build the powerful conservative infrastructure that essentially paved the way for the way for the presidency of Ronald Reagan, the rise of the Religious Right and the institutionalization of such right-wing powerhouses as the Heritage Foundation.

According to The New York Times, Scaife "inherited roughly $500 million in 1965, and with more family bequests and income from trust funds and investments in oil, steel and real estate, nearly tripled his net worth over his lifetime. But unlike his forebears, who were primarily benefactors of museums, public art collections, education and medicine, he gave hundreds of millions to promote conservative political causes."

BILL QUIGLEY FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

veterans(Photo: kevin dooley)

 

Despite the July 4 tributes, millions of US soldiers and veterans are in serious trouble.

 

Twenty two veterans kill themselves every day according to the Veterans Administration.   A study by the Los Angeles Times found veterans are more than twice as likely as other civilians to commit suicide.  Suicides among full-time soldiers, especially among male soldiers, are also well above the national civilian rate.  USA Today reported a suicide rate of 19.9 per 100,000 for civilian men compared to rates of 31.8 per 100,000 for male soldiers and 34.2 per 100,000 for men in the National Guard.

 

Over 57,000 veterans are homeless on any given night according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 

Unemployment is much higher among post 911 veterans than the general population according to the Department of Labor.

 

More than 1.4 million veterans are living below the poverty line according to US Senate report, and another 1.4 million are just above the line.  Of veterans between the ages of 18 and 34, 12.5 percent are living in poverty.

Over 900,000 veterans live in households which receive food stamps reports the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.  The use of food stamps by active duty service members appears to be at an all-time high, according to CNN.   In addition, many active duty service families receive a special military supplemental food allowance designed to replace food stamps for low income service families.

 

 

JANE STILLWATER FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

gunsgaloreRecent ad insert in Sacramento Bee. (Photo: BuzzFlash)

There was a gun show in San Francisco last weekend and hundreds of people were already lined up at the door and waiting, hours ahead of the opening bell.  Why?  "We want to buy guns, of course, but we also want to buy ammunition."  Of course.  What is the use of having a gun if you don't have any ammunition?

And what is the use of buying just one gun when you can buy two?  Or three or four -- or a hundred.

And what is the use of owning a derringer when you can own a pistol?  And why own a pistol when you can easily trade up and buy a semiautomatic weapon instead?  And why just have a semiautomatic weapon when you can get your hands on an AK-47?  Or a rocket-launcher -- better yet!

Friday, 04 July 2014 18:00

William Rivers Pitt: We Rise

WILLIAM RIVERS PITT FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaa4th(Photo: A.M. Willard)In all the darkness, the teeth-grinding fury, the disgust, and the desperate temptation to surrender to despair, I remember:

That Black people who were brought here in chains won their freedom, and then more freedom, and then equal status under the law. It was a long and horror-filled road, it should never have happened, but we as a nation fixed it, and many of us fight for it still (because, sadly, we have to).

That women have only had the right to vote for 95 of the years this country has existed, which frankly blows my whole mind. We as a nation fixed that, and many of us fight for it still (because, sadly, we have to).

That growing old used to be a dead-bang guarantee of growing poor. We as a nation fixed that, and many of us fight for it still (because, sadly, we have to).

That 146 people, mostly women, died in the Triangle Shirtwaist fire because as workers, they had no rights. We as a nation fixed that, and many of us fight for it still (because, sadly, we have to).

That marriage rights existed in a state of apartheid, to the exclusion of LGTB people, until the dam broke recently. We as a nation are still fixing that, and many of us fight for it still (because, sadly, we have to).

The curious thought experiment that is the United States of America is built on a lot of mythology, and a lot of greed, and the machinery of that construction was lubricated with an ocean of Native American and African blood...but it has a lot of soul, too, and an astonishing amount of potential.

STEVEN JONAS MD, MPH FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

aaaJesus(Photo: John Singleton Copley)We interrupt the two-part series on "The Significance of Dick Cheney" to deal with the breaking news of the Hobby Lobby decision. For it is as least as significant for the future of our nation as is Dick Cheney, what he stands for, and who he represents (the subject to which we shall return next week). The Hobby Lobby decision has many implications. First, one must agree with Justice Ginsburg that regardless of Justices Alito's caveats, the tide unleashed by the decision of the Right-wing Five is not going to stop at the shoreline of the separation of church and state any time soon. And for the long-range future of the United States, that is the most significant element of the decision.

That is not to say that it also has horrible outcomes for women and their sexual behavior, their private lives, and their private decision-making. As Andy Borowitz so cogently put it, "Supreme Court Majority Calls Case a Dispute between Women and People." Chiming in was everyone's favorite very-far-right GOP Senator Mike Lee of Utah who said that most women who use contraceptives do so for "recreational purposes." Like that's supposed to make a difference on whether or not a public corporation can discriminate against women on their choice of FDA approved contraceptives, on religious grounds. By the way, most folks label Lee as a "Tea Partier," as if such types really differ from "regular Republicans." Well, they do, but not on policy (except perhaps around the edges on immigration policy, which Eric Cantor found to his regret, at least among the 13% of eligible voters in his district who bothered to vote). If you look closely, it is almost always just a matter of style and wording.

There are a variety of other important negative aspects of this decision that are being widely and well dealt with from the Left. In my view, the most important one is how this decision ushers our one further, very big, step down the road to theocracy. For the Supreme Court has held that in matters of legislation, law, and public programs, the religious positions of one person (and of course they have recently reaffirmed the original 1880s railroad-lawyers-Court decision that corporations are people (see "Citizens United"), can outweigh the religious position, or non-religious but ethical/moral position, of another.

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