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Monday, 28 June 2010 08:45

Looks Like Sessions Has a Taste for Retribution

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Jeff Sessions still has his panties in a knot because:

In 1986, Sessions was a 39-year-old U.S. attorney in Alabama. His nomination to be a U.S. District Court judge was troubled from the start because of controversy surrounding his prosecution of civil rights activists for voting fraud.  Sessions' fate was sealed after Democrats called several witnesses who accused him of a pattern of racial insensitivity -- including calling a black lawyer "boy" and civil rights groups such as the NAACP "un-American." 

Sooooo:  Sessions: 'It's Conceivable A Filibuster Might Occur' Against Kagan


Honestly it would be hilarious if it weren't so pathetic -- John McCain still attempting to look and sound presidential:  (scroll down) "McCain: Generals Didn't Criticize Timetable, 'And They Should Have Because They Know Better.'

Would someone please put him out of his misery and tell him, he LOST.


Just have to wonder if Candy Crowley is auditioning for a spot on FOX NEWS.  She is so anti-Democrat, it's not even subtle:

Sunday show hosts allow Republicans to misinform about Kagan -- CNN's Crowley allows Cornyn to attack Kagan as having "expressed hostility to Second Amendment rights" and claimed Kagan "refus[ed] to allow military recruiters to come to Harvard." 

She allows the lies Repuglicans tell; she never challenges the remarks a Repuglican makes.  CNN can reshuffle the line-up, and switch anchor positions, but this total Repuglican bias is the reason CNN is way down in the ratings wars.


The scariest thing of all that's happening in America today -- the Repuglicans have managed to do to this country what all out war and what no terrorist have ever been able to do.  The conservative, "Extreme" Supreme Court has destroyed democracy in America

On January 21, 2010, the day the Supreme (now Extreme) Court under John Roberts declared that corporations and the very rich had a right to speak louder than the rest of us during campaigns, it was immediately clear that representative democracy in this country would be a thing of the past. The rich, already enormously powerful, were going to own the system outright. The court extended that January gift to the very rich, and dealt what is almost sure to be the death blow to American democracy, on June 7, 2010, when it declared in a case involving Arizona election law that public funding couldn't be used to even the odds for a less-than-rich candidate running against a candidate of great wealth or supported by great (corporate) wealth.