Obama Is Nominated by Acclamation

Wednesday, 27 August 2008 18:41 By John Murphy and John M Broder, The New York Times | name.

Obama Is Nominated by Acclamation
Democratic Presidential Nominee Barack Obama. (Photo: Scott Olson / Getty Images)

    Denver – Senator Barack Obama, the Hawaiian-born son of a father from Kenya and a mother from Kansas, officially became the presidential nominee of the Democratic Party on Wednesday, capping a meteoric rise from a little-known first-term senator to the first African-American to win a major-party nomination.

    Mr. Obama's formal nomination was secured at 6:48p.m. local time on the third day of the Democratic National Convention here, as his primary season rival, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, moved that Mr. Obama be nominated by acclamation.

    Mrs. Clinton had earlier told her delegates they were free to vote for Mr. Obama during the afternoon nominating roll call, but she did not direct them to do so.

    "I am here to release you as my delegates," she told her supporters during an emotional session at the downtown Sheraton, according to The Associated Press. Many responded with shouts of "No, no." She added, to cheers, "I am not telling you what to do."

    Mrs. Clinton announcement largely ended any suspense about how the nominating process would play out and assured that Mr. Obama would appear before the convention Thursday evening with the vigorous support of the more than 4,400 Democratic Party delegates, although many ballots were marked before Mrs. Clinton encouraged her delegates to cast their votes for Mr. Obama.

    The timing of the vote meant that before most Americans tune into the proceedings, Mr. Obama, the Hawaiian-born son of a father from Kenya and a mother from Kansas, will be the Democrats' nominee to become the 44th president of the United States.

    Mr. Obama himself arrived in Denver Wednesday afternoon. He recently gave reporters a brief hint of the acceptance speech he will deliver at Invesco Field at Mile High Thursday night. "I'm not aiming for a lot of high rhetoric," Mr. Obama said. "I am much more concerned with communicating how I intend to help middle-class families live their lives."

    Still, the formal nomination of Mr. Obama will not completely end the drama that has riven the Obama and Clinton camps and provided a consuming story line of this convention. At 7 p.m. local time, former President Bill Clinton is scheduled to address the convention, whose theme for Wednesday is foreign policy and a tribute to the military, giving the Clintons two nights of prominence at this high-profile event.

    A draft of Mr. Clinton's speech will be sent to the Obama campaign Wednesday afternoon, a Clinton aide said. Mr. Obama has said in recent days that the former president free to talk about whatever subject he chooses, though he has been granted only 10 minutes of podium time (though that might change). Mr. Clinton's aides said he intends to deliver an impassioned plea for Democratic unity and an end to what he will characterize as the fiscal and foreign policy disasters of the Bush administration.

    An aide to the former president said Mr. Clinton would be as supportive of Mr. Obama as Mrs. Clinton was in her 23-minute address on Tuesday.

    "It's as strong as she was in every respect," the aide said. "And shorter."

    Mrs. Clinton silenced some fears among Obama supporters that her endorsement of her bitter primary rival would be less than total with a well-received speech on Tuesday night.

    With her husband watching from a skybox, Mrs. Clinton rallied her supporters behind Mr. Obama, saying there was no more important task facing them and the country, regardless of any lingering ill will.

    "Whether you voted for me, or voted for Barack, the time is now to unite as a single party with a single purpose," Mrs. Clinton said Tuesday night to loud applause. "And you haven't worked so hard over the last 18 months, or endured the last eight years, to suffer through more failed leadership."

    Mr. Clinton's speech on Wednesday will be followed by the nomination of Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware as the party's vice-presidential candidate and finally by Mr. Biden's acceptance speech.

    Mr. Biden's task, in what will be the most important speech in his 36-year career in politics, will be to wrest the convention away from the Clintons and back to a sharp focus on the Obama-Biden ticket. Although he has been in the Senate since 1973 and run for president twice, Mr. Biden will also seek to introduce himself to an audience that knows little about him.

    In accepting Mr. Obama's invitation to join the ticket on Saturday, Mr. Biden characterized himself as the son of blue-collar America, an Irish-Catholic kid from Scranton, Pa., who has lived America's story. As he does in many speeches, he will likely reprise the personal and political setbacks he has suffered and say that he learned as a boy that "it's not how many times you get knocked down, it's how quickly you get up."

    He will seeks to connect both himself and Mr. Obama to the larger narrative of American struggle and triumph and to appeal with the working-class, older, white Americans who flocked to Mrs. Clinton in the primaries and kept the contest close right up to the end of the primary calendar.

    Mr. Biden, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is also expected to highlight his expertise on international matters, filling a gap in the young Mr. Obama's relatively thin public policy resume.

    Mr. Obama, who has been touring the battleground states of Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri and Montana this week, is set to arrive in Denver about 6 p.m. and will probably appear on stage with Mr. Biden at the end of his remarks, which begin at about 8:30 p.m. local time.

    The convention moves from the Pepsi Center to the 70,000-seat Invesco Field for Thursday night's acceptance speech by Senator Obama. Former Vice President Al Gore will speak before him.

    The Obama campaign announced Wednesday that after the convention ends, Mr. Obama and Mr. Biden will take a three-day bus tour of Pennsylvania, Ohio and Michigan, three states that Mr. Obama lost to Mrs. Clinton in the primaries and that will be heavily contested in the fall.

    DENVER – Senator Barack Obama, the Hawaiian-born son of a father from Kenya and a mother from Kansas, officially become the presidential nominee of the Democratic Party on Wednesday, capping a meteoric rise from a little-known first-term Senator to the first African-American to win a major party nomination.

    Mr. Obama's formal nomination was secured at xxx p.m. on the third day of the Democratic National Convention here, shortly after his primary season rival, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, released her delegates to vote for him and declared that she would support him and his running mate, Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr.

    Mrs. Clinton told her delegates they were free to vote for Mr. Obama during the afternoon nominating roll call, but she did not direct them to do so.

    "I am here to release you as my delegates," she told her supporters during an emotional session at the downtown Sheraton, according to The Associated Press. Many responded with shouts of "No, no." She added, to cheers, "I am not telling you what to do."

    Mrs. Clinton announcement largely ended any suspense about how the nominating process would play out and assured that Mr. Obama would appear before the convention Thursday evening with the vigorous support of the more than 4,400 Democratic Party delegates, although many ballots were marked before Mrs. Clinton encouraged her delegates to cast their votes for Mr. Obama.

    The timing of the vote meant that before most Americans tune into the proceedings, Mr. Obama, the Hawaiian-born son of a father from Kenya and a mother from Kansas, will be the Democrats' nominee to become the 44th president of the United States.

    Mr. Obama himself arrived in Denver Wednesday afternoon. He recently gave reporters a brief hint of the acceptance speech he will deliver at Invesco Field at Mile High Thursday night. "I'm not aiming for a lot of high rhetoric," Mr. Obama said. "I am much more concerned with communicating how I intend to help middle-class families live their lives."

    Still, the formal nomination of Mr. Obama will not completely end the drama that has riven the Obama and Clinton camps and provided a consuming story line of this convention. At 7 p.m. local time, former President Bill Clinton is scheduled to address the convention, whose theme for Wednesday is foreign policy and a tribute to the military, giving the Clintons two nights of prominence at this high-profile event.

    A draft of Mr. Clinton's speech will be sent to the Obama campaign Wednesday afternoon, a Clinton aide said. Mr. Obama has said in recent days that the former president free to talk about whatever subject he chooses, though he has been granted only 10 minutes of podium time (though that might change). Mr. Clinton's aides said he intends to deliver an impassioned plea for Democratic unity and an end to what he will characterize as the fiscal and foreign policy disasters of the Bush administration.

    An aide to the former president said Mr. Clinton would be as supportive of Mr. Obama as Mrs. Clinton was in her 23-minute address on Tuesday.

    "It's as strong as she was in every respect," the aide said. "And shorter."

    Mrs. Clinton silenced some fears among Obama supporters that her endorsement of her bitter primary rival would be less than total with a well-received speech on Tuesday night.

    With her husband watching from a skybox, Mrs. Clinton rallied her supporters behind Mr. Obama, saying there was no more important task facing them and the country, regardless of any lingering ill will.

    "Whether you voted for me, or voted for Barack, the time is now to unite as a single party with a single purpose," Mrs. Clinton said Tuesday night to loud applause. "And you haven't worked so hard over the last 18 months, or endured the last eight years, to suffer through more failed leadership."

    Mr. Clinton's speech on Wednesday will be followed by the nomination of Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware as the party's vice-presidential candidate and finally by Mr. Biden's acceptance speech.

    Mr. Biden's task, in what will be the most important speech in his 36-year career in politics, will be to wrest the convention away from the Clintons and back to a sharp focus on the Obama-Biden ticket. Although he has been in the Senate since 1973 and run for president twice, Mr. Biden will also seek to introduce himself to an audience that knows little about him.

    In accepting Mr. Obama's invitation to join the ticket on Saturday, Mr. Biden characterized himself as the son of blue-collar America, an Irish-Catholic kid from Scranton, Pa., who has lived America's story. As he does in many speeches, he will likely reprise the personal and political setbacks he has suffered and say that he learned as a boy that "it's not how many times you get knocked down, it's how quickly you get up."

    He will seeks to connect both himself and Mr. Obama to the larger narrative of American struggle and triumph and to appeal with the working-class, older, white Americans who flocked to Mrs. Clinton in the primaries and kept the contest close right up to the end of the primary calendar.

    Mr. Biden, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is also expected to highlight his expertise on international matters, filling a gap in the young Mr. Obama's relatively thin public policy resume.

    Mr. Obama, who has been touring the battleground states of Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri and Montana this week, is set to arrive in Denver about 6 p.m. and will probably appear on stage with Mr. Biden at the end of his remarks, which begin at about 8:30 p.m. local time.

    The convention moves from the Pepsi Center to the 70,000-seat Invesco Field for Thursday night's acceptance speech by Senator Obama. Former Vice President Al Gore will speak before him.

    The Obama campaign announced Wednesday that after the convention ends, Mr. Obama and Mr. Biden will take a three-day bus tour of Pennsylvania, Ohio and Michigan, three states that Mr. Obama lost to Mrs. Clinton in the primaries and that will be heavily contested in the fall.

Last modified on Friday, 12 December 2008 21:16